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I go to swim.
I go swimming.
I go to hike.
I go hiking. ( Hm, MountainHiker?)

How would you explain? Are they equal? For me, I'd think 'go to swim' emphasizes more on the action you do, it's the whole thing of swimming.
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They are not equal. "I go to swim" or "I go to hike" seems to indicate that you are now leaving to do those activities, and, if that is the case, would probably be best is used in the present progressive: "I am going to swim" or "I am going to hike" (however, note that these sound more like you're using the verb "to go" as an auxiliary to create the future tense). In my opinion, this construction places more emphasis on the verb "go" than on the infinitive that follows.

"I go swimming" and "I go hiking" give the sense that these are activities that you do somewhat regularly. For example, one might say, "I go swimming often" or "I go swimming every Friday"; to use the other construction to say these things ("I go to swim often") sounds awkward, even though it is standard English.

If you are in doubt, choose the "I go (verb)ing" construction. To imply that it's an activity that you enjoy, a better (i.e., more precise) way to say it would be "I like to go hiking" (or whatever it is you like to do).
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Yeah, if you say "I go to swim" it would mean that you go so you can swim, not that you're actually going swimming.
Thanks, dino and migo.
I'm going to swim. --> It emphasizes more on what you are going to do.
I like to go swimming. --> habbit or hobby

How about these?
I love to swim.
I love swimming.
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Quite interesting! I agree.
Well, think "I love to swim" is incorrect. But you can say "I'd love to awim" which means that you fancy swimming at this moment.

You could also say "I like to swim" but this conveys the sense that you consider it a good idea or consider it sensible to swim whereas "I like swimming" is simply that you enjoy swimming.
What's the difference between

1- I love to swim in the early morning.

2- I love swimming in the early morning.

I think they are not chalk and cheese but quite similar in the meaning. For me, number two sounds stronger if one is talking about his habit. Swimming in the early morning is fantastic and I LOVE it. However, number one indicates somewhat less strong in the emotional sense. It's more neutral than the second one. I wouldn't think that 'I love to swim' is that incorrect. It can be right if there is more context.

What do you think?
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Well, think "I love to swim" is incorrect. But you can say "I'd love to awim" which means that you fancy swimming at this moment.

You could also say "I like to swim" but this conveys the sense that you consider it a good idea or consider it sensible to swim whereas "I like swimming" is simply that you enjoy swimming.

I disagree with both of these, Anonymous. I don't see anything incorrect in "I love to swim," and I see very little, if any, difference between "I like to swim" and "I like swimming." Specifically, I don't think "I like to swim" carries any implications that it is sensible or good for you. You could certainly say "I like to swim, even though it always gives me an ear infection."

The difference, or lack of difference, between the gerund ("I like simming") and the infinitive (I like to swim") has been discussed here before at great length. Apart from the fact that certain verbs can be followed by one but not the other, (for example, you can say "I enjoy swimming" but not "I enjoy to swim") I think there isvirtually no difference in meaning between the two that would be consistent in the minds of all listeners.

"I go to swim" and "I go swimming" work a little differently. As an earlier poster suggested, "I go to swim" sounds like the answer to a question of this sort: "Why do you go the recreation center every Sunday?" "I go there in order to swim."
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