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The following sentences are correct because I hear them all the time:

1: God bless you all.

2: May this post find you in good state of health.

If it were up to me then I would like to write the above sentences in this way:

1i: God blesses you all.

2i: May this post finds you in good state of health.

I know my way is incorrect. Why are the sentences #1 and #2 correct?
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Comments  
Jackson,

This may not be the answer you want to hear. Sometimes, we just have to accept things as they are, as in the case of # 1.

For # 2, the rules dictate that verbs immediately after any auxiliary word should be in it's bare form.
Hi Jackson,
God bless you!, God bless America!, Long live the Queen!, etc. are all fixed expressions.

The same applies to "May this post find...", l'd say it's a fixed structure that is used that way. Emotion: smile
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GoodmanFor # 2, the rules dictate that verbs immediately after any auxiliary word should be in it's bare form.

Hi Goodman,

Is may used as an auxiliary word/verb in the following sentence?

2: May this post find you in good state of health.
Jackson66121: God bless you all. (IMO, 'May' has been left out from the sentence. MAY God bless you all.)

2. May this post finds you in good state of health. (The verb after 'may' should be plural and in the simple present tense as in sentence 1 in bold.)

Yoong Liat
Jackson66121: God bless you all. (IMO, 'May' has been left out from the sentence. MAY God bless you all.)


Hi Yoong,

Most of the time may is left out as in God bless America.
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Jackson6612
Yoong Liat
Jackson66121: God bless you all. (IMO, 'May' has been left out from the sentence. MAY God bless you all.)

Hi Yoong,

Most of the time may is left out as in God bless America.
What I'm trying to explain is why we say "God bless you" and not 'God blesses.you", which appears more correct grammatically.
IMO, this is because of the word 'may', which is left out of the sentence.

I hope I've made myself clearer now.
Yoong Liat
Jackson66121: God bless you all. (IMO, 'May' has been left out from the sentence. MAY God bless you all.)

2. May this post finds you in good state of health. (The verb after 'may' should be plural and in the simple present tense [May I know the reason for that?]as in sentence 1 in bold.)

KooyeenHi Jackson,
God bless you!, God bless America!, Long live the Queen!, etc. are all fixed expressions.
As far as I know, these are all examples of the subjunctive. Basically, they are remnants of a verb form that isn't used much anymore and these have basically survived as idiomatic expressions. Some further examples are "far be it from me", "be that as it may" and "so be it".
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