+0
Hello! This is my first post here. Nice to meet you! Emotion: smile

I am confused with this expression, "will be going to + Vb".

eg. I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.

To me, this expression is sort of redundant. Why do you need to use both "will" and "be+going to"? I somewhat understand the differences between future meaning expressions; "be+going to", "be ~ing", "will" and "will be ~ing" but I've got confused since I heard this "will be going to ~".

Is this expression common to use? Is there any specific meaning on this? What kind of occasion or circumstances should I use this expression?

I really appreciate if you teach me! Thank you Emotion: thinking
1 2 3
Comments  
welcome to here soylista

I suppose although it is not very common, it is correct grammatically

but don't mix "will be v+ing" and "be going to verb"

because "will be verb+ing " express us that you're continuing to do something in future. The action continues in future.

"will" and " be going to" express us future. you're thinking of to do something in future maybe it is plan or hope.

I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow. In this sentence target is visit Aunt Carol. Action is going.

as it were, you are imagining this.

You will be going to Aunt Carol tomorrow and ask yourself why will you be going to Aunt Carol tomorrow?

The answer is to visit. In that case we can put in together these sentences like that "You will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow."

I hope it is clear to understand for you.
SoylistaHello! This is my first post here. Nice to meet you! Emotion: smile

I am confused with this expression, "will be going to + Vb".

eg. I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.

To me, this expression is sort of redundant. Why do you need to use both "will" and "be+going to"? I somewhat understand the differences between future meaning expressions; "be+going to", "be ~ing", "will" and "will be ~ing" but I've got confused since I heard this "will be going to ~".

Although theoretically possible, not one occurence of such a construction was found in the Survey of English Usage (Palmer). Thoeretically the "will be" represent the immediate nature of the event referred to and "be going to" the planned nature of the future event. I'd avoid using it if I were you.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
There is nothing wrong with the way it is, but there are better ways to say it such as I am going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.

But in your sentence,
I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow,
will be going = your action (what)
to visit = your purpose (why)
GazapoThere is nothing wrong with the way it is, but there are better ways to say it such as I am going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.

But in your sentence,
I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow,
will be going = your action (what)
to visit = your purpose (why)
Could you please explain a little more? Thanks.
SoylistaI am confused with this expression, "will be going to + Vb".
eg. I will be going to visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.
To me, this expression is sort of redundant. Why do you need to use both "will" and "be+going to"? I somewhat understand the differences between future meaning expressions; "be+going to", "be ~ing", "will" and "will be ~ing" but I've got confused since I heard this "will be going to ~".
Is this expression common to use? Is there any specific meaning on this? What kind of occasion or circumstances should I use this expression?
[url=http://www.stanford.edu/class/linguist203/203-2.html ] Stanford Linguistics/Grammaticalization of "Be Going To"[/url]
The full semanticization and grammaticalization of "be going to" is evidenced when the following subject and/or the verb is incompatible with purposiveness, for example, an inanimate subject or a verb of mental experience such as "hear". Once the semanticization of later time/future had occurred, the "will" future could no longer be used with "be going to", presumably because it had become partially redundant, and did not fit the auxiliary verb structure into which the construction had been absorbed. (Note, however, that the "will"-future can still occur in the main verb construction "be going to", as in "I will be going to visit Aunt Mildred tomorrow.")

[url=http://www.bbc.co.uk/worldservice/learningenglish/events/grammar.shtml ] BBC World Service/Learning English Grammar (Future Tenses)[/url]
[QUESTION]I have heard people mixing tenses - for example, saying, "I will be going to see him". Isn't that just the same as, "I'll be seeing him."?
[ANSWER]We choose between a wide range of future tenses and sometimes combine these tenses. Each possibility expresses a different attitude towards the event.
"I will be going to see him" has a different meaning from either "I'll be seeing him." or "I'm going to see him." It suggests that at a particular moment in the future I will be preparing to see him.

paco
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Welcome to English Forums!

This is the going to of motion, not the going to of the future.
Here are sentences which use both:

I am going to go shopping. (going of the future; go of motion)
I am going to be going now. (going of the future; going of motion)
I am going to be going to New York next year. (going of the future; going of motion)

Note that only the going to of the future can be used in its reduced form gonna.

We would not reduce the subject sentence by saying I will be gonna visit Aunt Carol tomorrow.
Likewise, we do not say I am going to be gonna New York next year.
But we can easily say I'm gonna go to New York next year.

It would be grammatically strange to use both will and going to of the future in the same sentence (See next example). But that's not what you have here.

I will be going to stay here for a month before returning home.

CJ
Hi yunus,

>welcome to here soylista Thank you! Emotion: big smile

Thank you so much for the explanation. I thought this is gramatically correct, too, but just didn't get the meaning wise or "nuance" of what the sentence is trying to say. So, this construction is not "will" + "be going to" and it is the future progressive + infinitive? If so, I think I can understand better.

Thank you again!!
MilkyAlthough theoretically possible, not one occurence of such a construction was found in the Survey of English Usage (Palmer). Thoeretically the "will be" represent the immediate nature of the event referred to and "be going to" the planned nature of the future event. I'd avoid using it if I were you.
Hi Milky,

Thank you for your reply! Before posting my question here, I checked the BNC and found a couple of examples of this construction. http://sara.natcorp.ox.ac.uk/cgi-bin/saraWeb?qy=will+be+going+to

Only 4 examples out of 30 solutions, so it's pretty much uncommon and I should avoid using it as you noted.

Thank you again!
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Show more