+1
I am not a native speaker, who studies English as a foreign language.

I need help from the natives.

We can prevent growth gone wrong within us.

(?) why not 'going' in here??

Reading certain texts, I find that sentence, which seems grammatically wrong, I think.

Why and how is 'GONE' used after growth?

I mean, is it grammatically correct and no problem to write 'growth gone wrong'?

'Something goes wrong', not 'Something is gone wrong', is the normally used form, as I know.

If so, is it correct to write 'Something going wrong', not 'Something gone wrong'??

I've googled 'gone wrong' and found that 'gone wrong' form is used in many texts.

But I am just curious about whether wrting 'sth gone wrong' is GRAMMATICALLY allowed or not.
1 2
Comments  
Hi,

Let me first try to understand the writer's intended meaning. Is this, for example, in a medical context that discusses a cancerous growth?

Clive
"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptiness in one's life.

When a salamander loese a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way, when a human geing sutters

an emotional loss thatis not properly dealt with, the body often responds by developing a new growth.

It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth, we can prevent growth GONE wrong within us."

It's the whole paragraph.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Can it be different according to the writer's intended meaning?
Now I log in.

"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptiness

in one's life. When a salamander loses a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way,

when a human being suffers an emotional loss that is not properly dealt with, the body often

responds by developing a new growth. It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth,

we can prevent growth gone wrong within us."

It's the whole paragraph.
Now I log in.

"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptiness

in one's life. When a salamander loses a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way,

when a human being suffers an emotional loss that is not properly dealt with, the body often

responds by developing a new growth. It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth,

we can prevent growth gone wrong within us."

It's the whole paragraph.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
Hi,

"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptiness

in one's life. When a salamander loses a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way,

when a human being suffers an emotional loss that is not properly dealt with, the body often

responds by developing a new growth. It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth,

we can prevent growth gone wrong within us."

Think of it as a shortened form of -

" . . . we can prevent growth [ that has ] gone wrong within us."

Clive
CliveHi,"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptinessin one's life. When a salamander loses a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way,when a human being suffers an emotional loss that is not properly dealt with, the body oftenresponds by developing a new growth. It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth,we can prevent growth gone wrong within us." Think of it as a shortened form of - " . . . we can prevent growth [ that has ] gone wrong within us." Clive
Is it possible to omit 'that have'??

As I know, the forms like 'relative pronoun + be', for example 'that is/are' or 'that have/has been',

can be omitted.

FOR EXAMPLE,

He meets the girl (that has been) interested in him. <- (O) BUT..

He meets the girl that has done many things for him. <- He meets the girl done many things for him. (?????????)

According to your explanation, in above sentence 'that has' also could be omitted, which is ungrammatic.

The sentence I asked about first seems to be used expressioin and grammatically no problem.

But your this '[that has]' explanation is not proper.. or I'm stupid..
nocyNow I log in.

"One of the most common precursors of cancer is a traumatic loss or a feeling of emptiness
in one's life. When a salamander loses a limb, it grows a new one. In an analogous way,
when a human being suffers an emotional loss that is not properly dealt with, the body often
responds by developing a new growth. It appears that if we can react to loss with personal growth,
we can prevent growth gone wrong within us."

It's the whole paragraph.
In this context, the author is trying to say if people can react to the loss, they can prevent growth gone wrong within them [cancer].

And precisely in this context, growth going wrong within us just won't work. It will means... if people can react to the loss, they can prevent growth going wrong within them [literally a growth that is going wrong].

It's not a grammar issue here. It's just how the author's style of writing and how he/she wish to phrase it to fit into the sentence context.

Hope this helps.
Try out our live chat room.
Show more