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Why

It's a nice day today. I think I will go for a walk. is correct

It's a nice day today. I think I am going to go for a walk. is not

Are you coming with me? No I will stay here. is correct

Are you coming with me? No I am going to stay here is not

I think she won't pass the exams. is correct

I think she is not going to pass the exams. is not

Thanks

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They are all OK. The be-going-to future tends to suggest greater inevitability, but both forms are used by native speakers. In your first and second examples, will reflects the speaker's decision and is the usual choice. In your third example, neither is particularly normal, as the negative is usually transferred to the main clause: I don't think she will / is going to pass the exams.

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It's the "I think" that makes the difference. "going to" usually connotes a definite plan. "I think" connotes uncertainty. There is a slight clash between the two.

From the following Google results we can say, roughly, that after "I think", "I'll" or "I will" is used four times as much as "I'm going to" or "I am going to". Also interesting - The contracted forms are used twice as often as the full forms.

"I think I'll ..." 8,490,000
"I think I will ..." 4,420,000

"I think I'm going to ..." 2,170,000
"I think I am going to ..." 1,420,000

CJ
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Comments  
Mister MicawberThey are all OK. The be-going-to future tends to suggest greater inevitability, but both forms are used by native speakers. In your first and second examples, will reflects the speaker's decision and is the usual choice. In your third example, neither is particularly normal, as the negative is usually transferred to the main clause: I don't think she will / is going to pass the exams.

<In your first and second examples, will reflects the speaker's decision and is the usual choice. >

Doesn't "going to go" also reflect the speaker's decision there? And, how can you tell that the "will" form is the usual choice?

Google gives:

20,900 pages for"going to go for a walk".

18,600 pages for "will go for a walk"
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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