1 2 3 4 5
page My grandmama made a delicious beef golosh.

I'm so Hungary I could eat a pair of goulashes, right now!

You have the sole of a true Hungarian.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
I think we'd call those "rubber overshoes."

Yeah, I saw that when Googling.

You'll see many odd phrases when Googling, but have you ever actually heard anyone call them rubber overshoes? "Overshoes", yes, but never "rubber overshoes". "Galoshes" though is a standard English word that has been around a very long time.

Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
You'll see many odd phrases when Googling, but have you ever actually heard anyone call them rubber overshoes? "Overshoes", yes, but never "rubber overshoes". "Galoshes" though is a standard English word that has been around a very long time.

When I was a kid they were called "rubbers." As in "It's raining out, so wear your rubbers!" (We don't get snow in coastal California.)

William R Ward (Email Removed) http://bill.wards.net Help save the San Jose Earthquakes - http://www.soccersiliconvalley.com /
You'll see many odd phrases when Googling, but have you ... English word that has been around a very long time.

When I was a kid they were called "rubbers." As in "It's raining out, so wear your rubbers!" (We don't get snow in coastal California.)

Rubbers were different from galoshes AIRT. Rubbers were low-top things they just covered the shoe, but did not go further up the ankle. Rubbers were more like shoes and galoshes were more like boots, one might say.

Steny '08!
When I was a kid they were called "rubbers." As in "It's raining out, so wear your rubbers!" (We don't get snow in coastal California.)

Rubbers were different from galoshes AIRT. Rubbers were low-top things they just covered the shoe, but did not go further up the ankle. Rubbers were more like shoes and galoshes were more like boots, one might say.

Were? Do you feel they no longer exist? I still have a pair of Totes that I keep around in case I travel to the north in slushy weather. The "north", in this case, is any state where snow in any form remains on the ground.
Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
When I was a kid they were called "rubbers." As in "It's raining out, so wear your rubbers!" (We don't get snow in coastal California.)

Rubbers were different from galoshes AIRT. Rubbers were low-top things they just covered the shoe, but did not go further up the ankle. Rubbers were more like shoes and galoshes were more like boots, one might say.

My rubbers went halfway to the knee and were definitely boot-shaped.

Bill.

William R Ward (Email Removed) http://bill.wards.net Help save the San Jose Earthquakes - http://www.soccersiliconvalley.com /
My rubbers went halfway to the knee and were definitely boot-shaped.

I'm sure the ladies were very impressed Emotion: smile
R.
Rubbers were different from galoshes AIRT. Rubbers were low-top things ... shoes and galoshes were more like boots, one might say.

Were? Do you feel they no longer exist?

I don't doubt that they still exist somewhere, but they nonetheless seem sort of archaic to me. So too with galoshes, I suppose.

I had a pair of rubber overshoes, ones that went a bit above the ankle, no buckle or anything like that. I'm not sure what those were, but I wouldn't have described them as "rubbers". I might have used "galoshes" to describe them. I think these got destroyed last winter in ***g*. I'm not sure what ****g people use.
I still have a pair of Totes that I keep around in case I travel to the north in slushy weather. The "north", in this case, is any state where snow in any form remains on the ground.

Do you consider slush a form of snow? I'd say that slush may be derived from snow, at least in part, but once it's slush it's no longer snow.

Steny '08!
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
You'll see many odd phrases when Googling, but have you ... English word that has been around a very long time.

When I was a kid they were called "rubbers." As in "It's raining out, so wear your rubbers!" (We don't get snow in coastal California.)

Yes, that too, but never "rubber overshoes", as one poster opined.
Charles Riggs
They are no accented letters in my email address
Show more