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It's part of lyric of a song that I think you would all know

but did they really mean "gay" here or could "gay" carry another meaning otherwise than the most widely recognized one?

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"Old Black Joe" is a parlor song by Stephen Foster (1826–1864). It was published by Firth, Pond & Co. of New York in 1860.

At that time "gay" meant "carefree, full of joy."

The meaning has changed quite a bit over the years. When reading old texts, you need to use the word meanings at the time it was written, not the contemporary meaning, which can be quite different.

https://www.etymonline.com/search?q=gay

Comments  
kenny1999but did they really mean "gay" here or could "gay" carry another meaning otherwise than the most widely recognized one?

And so "gay" is officially a worsened word.

The recent change in the meaning of "gay" took place in the 1960s when it became the preferred self-identifyng term among homosexual men. It seems to have derived not from the normal sense of the word but from some sort of underworld slang. "Old Black Joe" was published in 1860, a hundred years before this, and you can still look the word up in any dictionary and see what he meant by it.

It is not possible to use "gay" today without invoking homosexuality. "Gaily" is perhaps a little safer.

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.