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Hi,

When you signed off at the work, and when someone asks you whether you've finished, and you are about to leave the workplace, how would you reply?

Do you say something like following?

" I am finished / I signed off."

"He's finished/ He's gone home. "

I just don't know the natural way to say it.

Oppositely, when you want to ask someone if she's has finished her shift, do you ask something like following?

" Are you finished your shift? "

Thanks in advance!!
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Hi Victorycountry

If by "sign off" you mean that you used some kind of clock that keeps a record of the times you arrive at and leave work, you could say these:

I (have) clocked out.
I've punched out for the day. (I think "punch out" is a little old-fashioned nowadays)
I'm leaving now.
I'm going home now.

If someone asked you about what you are doing, you would not answer with "he".
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You say simply that he is not in the office at the moment.

I'm sorry, Jim's not in the office at the moment, but I expect to see him tomorrow morning. Can I help you with something, or would you prefer for me to take a message?

You can also say:

I'm sorry, Jim's gone home for the day. etc.
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Hi, Yankee!

Thanks for the examples.

But what if the person asking you is not a collegue.

What if a customer asking about a particular staff?

In that case, what are the possible way to respond to it?

Can you say 'Well, sir, S/He clocked out'?

Thanks again!
 BarbaraPA's reply was promoted to an answer.
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Thanks Mrs. Grammar Geek.

I wish I could go back to the past and attended the primary school.

There you can learn English with the native children.

I see a lot of my country people who came at the age of 9 or younger, speak the language very fluently, well, precisely very much natively.

I still have to translate the languages in my head before spilling them out.

But it has been said, "Never say never"

I believe I can still become like, it's all upto me. ( It'll easier to do so than conquor the Mt. Everest )

I also read about people who learned the language quite fast and become very fluent in it within 2 years and I hope I can do the same.

Thanks again, Mrs. Grammar Geek, and have a lovely day!
Thanks Mrs. Grammar Geek.

I wish I could go back to the past and attended the primary school.

There you can learn English with the native children.

I see a lot of my country people who came at the age of 9 or younger, speak the language very fluently, well, precisely very much natively.

I still have to translate the languages in my head before spilling them out.

But it has been said, "Never say never"

I believe I can still become like, it's all upto me. ( It'll easier to do so than conquor the Mt. Everest )

I also read about people who learned the language quite fast and become very fluent in it within 2 years and I hope I can do the same.

Thanks again, Mrs. Grammar Geek, and have a lovely day!