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Good wine needs no bush , and perhaps products that people really want need no hard-sell or soft-sell TV push. Why not? Look at pot.

see link:

http://www.brainyquote.com/quotes/quotes/m/marshallmc120168.html

What's the meaning of the sentence and the word "bush"?

Thank you in advance!Emotion: stick out tongue
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It means that something that is good does not need advertising.

Ancient Greek wine sellers used to hang a branch of ivy outside to advertise their wine shop (in the way that shops still have signs to advertise their contents).

Good wine needs no bush is a phrase that has been used by Shakespear and others, but I wouldn't say it is all that current, in British English, anyway. I'd never heard of it and went on an internet search for this info.
Thanks !
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I have encountered the phrase, but never actually heard anyone use it. It means that if someone provides a good service or product, advertising is not necessary as it will spread by word of mouth
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Good Wine Needs no Bush

Education does not make you happy. And nor does freedom. We don’t become happy just because we’re free, if we are, or because we have been educated, if we have. But because education may be the means by which we realise we’re happy. It opens our eyes, our ears, tells us where delights are lurking, convinces us that there is only one freedom of any importance whatsoever, that of the mind, and gives us the assurance, the confidence, to walk the path our mind, our educated mind, offers.

Iris Murdoch
s. Filmbiographie 2001, Titel: IRIS
In the vinwyard area around Vienna, a bush is placed on the roof when a new wine is ready to drink. I always understood this to be the origin of the phrase. I also believe it is the origin of construction workers placing an everygreen on top of a large building when the framing is complete
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You say "Good wine needs no bush is a phrase that has been used by Shakespear and others, but I wouldn't say it is all that current, in British English, anyway. I'd never heard of it and went on an internet search for this info."

I think the fact that you cannot spell Shakespeare might explain why you have never heard of it. It is in limited use but only among the literate.
Literary evidence shows that Shakespeare spelt his own name in a variety of ways, including "Shakespear", and funnily enough, never "Shakespeare", you condescending ***.
During an English lesson at school some time back in the 1960's my teacher explained that at one time a symbol of a bush was printed on a wine label to denote quality. As I understand it, the symbol resembled a thumbnail of a Christmas tree. Interestingly this logo, was adopted by a TV manufacturer called Bush, of the time (the '60's) to imply quality.
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