+0
I got her to sit down on the bed while I fetched some bandages.

What's the difference between 'got her to sit down' and 'sat her down'?
Thanks.
+0
New2grammarI got her to sit down on the bed while I fetched some bandages.

What's the difference between 'got her to sit down' and 'sat her down'?
Thanks.

I got her to sit down - she did the sitting down

I sat her down - you helped her to sit down, perhaps by guiding her down until she was in the sitting position.
+0
optilang
New2grammarI got her to sit down on the bed while I fetched some bandages.

What's the difference between 'got her to sit down' and 'sat her down'?
Thanks.

I got her to sit down - she did the sitting down

I sat her down - you helped her to sit down, perhaps by guiding her down until she was in the sitting position.

I agree, but I think the 2nd can also mean the first, say a teacher could say:
Today, in my English class, Kathy didn't know what she was talking about, so I sat her down.
or
Today, in my English class, Kathy didn't know what she was talking about, so I had her sit down.
or
Today, in my English class, Kathy didn't know what she was talking about, so I made her (to) sit down.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
Comments  
That's interesting. Thanks, Optilang.
 Marius Hancu's reply was promoted to an answer.
Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies
Further to my first response:

I got her to sit down - I persuaded her to sit down.

I sat her down - I made her sit down - with or without physical help.
Thanks, Optilang and MH. It sounds like the first "got her to" is more polite if no physical help given, am I right to say that?