After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I was astounded to discover that they all had "gourmet" listed as a noun and nothing but. I have been carelessly using it as an adjective for ... well, quite a while.

Is using "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

- Matt Shepherd
http://www.man-man.org
1 2
After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I was astounded to discover that they all had "gourmet" listed ... an adjective for ... well, quite a while. Is using "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

It's certainly common but tyat doesn't make it right. I don't like it any more than I like "decorator" as an adjective.
It's certainly common but that doesn't make it right.

Yes it does.
Robert, feeling descriptive today
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After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I ... "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

It's certainly common but tyat doesn't make it right. I don't like it any more than I like "decorator" as an adjective.

english has traditionally changed words from noun to verb to adjective with ease . my most hated favorite is tasked as used by the military . they always" i was tasked "to do something in stead of saying " i've been given the task ". it grates on my ear .
After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I wasastounded to discover that they all had "gourmet" listed as ... an adjective for ... well, quite a while. Is using "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

MWCD11 lists "gourmet" as an adjective under the main entry for its use as a noun.

Raymond S. Wise
Minneapolis, Minnesota USA
E-mail: mplsray @ yahoo . com
After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I ... "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

It's certainly common but tyat doesn't make it right. I don't like it any more than I like "decorator" as an adjective.

I hate hearing "harbor" used to refer to a body of water.
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It's certainly common but that doesn't make it right.

Yes it does. Robert, feeling descriptive today

In that case it's definately alright then, innit?
After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I was astounded to discover that they all had "gourmet" listed ... an adjective for ... well, quite a while. Is using "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

Using nouns attributively is very common. In this case, it is common enough to be in the standard desk dictionaries COD10 (UK), Chambers (UK), and MWCD11 (US). I notice that the AHD does not list the attributive (or adjectival) use. Is the "handful of dictionaries" comprised of AHDs?
(COD10)
gourmet /"[email protected], "gO;-/
· n. a connoisseur of good food.
Ø (as modifier) suitable for a gourmet: a gourmet meal. – ORIGIN C19: Fr., orig. ‘wine taster’, influenced by gourmand.

(MWCD11)
Main Entry:gour£met
Pronunciation:****-*m*, ***-*
Function:noun
Etymology:French, from Middle French, alteration of gromet boy servant, vintner's assistant, probably ultimately from Middle English grom groom Date:1820
a connoisseur of food and drink; broadly : CONNOISSEUR 2 a film gourmet
synonyms see EPICURE
–gourmet adjective
^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^^ NOTE!
(Chambers, in part)
gourmet ... /adj/ of, for or befitting the gourmet or the gourmet's taste.

How old is this usage? The SOED5 tags it as "E20", meaning 1900-1929. Here are some citations from
(OED2, v3)

1904 Westm. Gaz. 21 Jan. 8/1 The public in the matter of jokes isgourmand rather than gourmet.

1908 Athenæum 11 Apr. 447/3 Few can hope to rival the gourmet-author(of The Gourmet's Guide to Europe) in the extent of their experiences.

1967 K. Giles Death in Diamonds vi. 111 It was a wonderful, gourmetmeal.

1971 M. McCarthy Birds of America 72 Gift shops selling ‘gourmet’food.
After checking a handful of dictionaries around the office, I wasastounded to discover that they all had "gourmet" listed as ... an adjective for ... well, quite a while. Is using "gourmet" as an adjective common, or am I competely bonkers?

What's the best dictionary in the office? Any good dictionary (eg. Chambers) will list "gourmet" as an adjective.
Adrian
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