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Are the following grammatical?

  • She graduated in law with a bachelor degree.
  • She did a post-graduate course in law and graduated with a master degree.
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healerShe graduated in law with a bachelor's degree.

This is not natural, especially because of the underlined part.

She is a law graduate.

She holds a bachelor's in law.

She did a degree in law.

healerShe did a post-graduate course in law and earned a master's (degree). and graduated with a master degree.

Correct as shown.

You may say she graduated with distinction/honors.

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healer

Are the following grammatical?

  • She graduated in law with a bachelor degree.
  • She did a post-graduate course in law and graduated graduating with a masters degree.

I would replace "and graduated" with "graduating".

In an appropriate context, both your examples are fine.

anonymousI would replace "and graduated" with "graduating".

Are you positive?

  • She did a post-graduate course in law and graduated graduating with a master's degree.

# 1 "Graduated" clearly defined the event timeline (bachelor degree) which was completed. I don't think # 2 is the context to use a present participle in my opinion.

graduating is fine.

A participle clause inherits its tense from the main clause that it accompanies, so there's nothing "present tense" about graduating here. We know it's a participle clause and not a tense because there is no auxiliary for the verb graduating as in is/are/was/were graduating.

The idea is something like the following:

She did a postgraduate course in law which resulted/ended in her graduating with a master's degree.

CJ

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Thanks for your help.

anonymousShe did a post-graduate course in law graduating with a master's degree.

I do have problem accepting the replacement here. I feel that the word "graduating" being used instead here seems to convey that the action was still in progress even though the main clause is in simple past tense.

anonymous"Graduated" clearly defined the event timeline (bachelor degree) which was completed.

I accepted this statement being correct.

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CalifJimShe did a postgraduate course in law which resulted/ended in her graduating with a master's degree.

I accept and like this version. But don't you think my original sentence which is "She did a post-graduate course in law and graduated with a master degree." is correct and simple?

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