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There is a typical grammar question I want you to think over.

In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.

When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.

Yes, the answer is to correct "graduates college" to "graduates from college." For 'graduate' is intranstive verb, as in "He graduated from the university last June."

However, in Webster's Learner's Dictionary, there's also a transtive usage.

c [+ obj] US informal : to earn a degree or diploma from (a school, college, or university)
▪ He joined the navy after graduating high school.

Since we are not so much grammarians as people learning English as a second langage, I think this question is improper. The question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in leaners rather than improving their ability to use English.

What do you think of my statement?

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Stenka25The A question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in learners
I don't understand. What are you afraid of? Exam questions?

Are you saying that you were asked that question, and in your answer you used "graduate" in its transitive form, as described in Webster's learning dictionary, and your teacher considered your answer incorrect?

CJ
I want to know whether this kind of question is proper or not.

I mean, in descriptive grammatical sense, this question seems wrong to me.

And I asked what do you think about my thought.

Thanks.
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Stenka25I want to know whether this kind of question is proper or not.
I assume this is the question you are referring to:

In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.

When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.


____________

This kind of question is proper. Yes. It is quite typical in an English course to be asked to correct the part of a sentence which is wrong.
____________
Stenka25I mean, in descriptive grammatical sense, this question seems wrong to me.
This particular question has a problem, which you have pointed out. Nevertheless, this type of question is very commonly seen.

CJ
Stenka25There is a typical grammar question I want you to think over.In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.▪ When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.Yes, the answer is to correct "graduates college" to "graduates from college." For 'graduate' is intranstive verb, as in "He graduated from the university last June."However, in Webster's Learner's Dictionary, there's also a transtive usage.c [+ obj] US informal : to earn a degree or diploma from (a school, college, or university)▪ He joined the navy after graduating high school.Since we are not so much grammarians as people learning English as a second langage, I think this question is improper. The question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in leaners rather than improving their ability to use English.What do you think of my statement?Edit/Delete Message

I think your statement makes sense.

In some degree, such tests tame the learners to the safe usage of a word rather than encourage them to find more usages of it.
Hi Maple!

Long time no see. Emotion: smile Welcome back!!!
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Hi Tanit.

Yes, too long no seeEmotion: smile! I hope you are all fine!

Merry Christmas!

Happy New Year!

This is another situation where our verbal language use is being slaughtered/butchered by the acceptance of slang and/or improper words and phrases. As an English major, journalist, technical writer, etc. I am appalled at how our society has "slid into acceptance" of "speaking and writing with inappropriate use of words and phrases such as "I graduated university" rather than "I graduated from the university" as well as "beginning a sentence with a conjunction." When I read an article that "begins a sentence with the words but or and" I know for certain that I need only to read a little further in the article to observe other obvious and discouraging anomalies.

It is a fact, indeed, that in our society … as we supposedly have progressed toward the utopian idea of total equality of all without regard to life circumstances, our standards of the written and spoken English language have been "dramatically lowered to accommodate those in our society who do not want to improve their use of the English language and/or adhere to appropriate language usage in the written and spoken forms. "

The controversy over "whether or not it is appropriate to begin a sentence with the words and, but, so, etc" is a primary example of "lowering our standards to accommodate lower intellect." Another pathetic example is the change in the acceptance of pronunciation of the word "THE" from the phonetic sounding of "THEE" to that of "THUH" !!! Such pronunciation never ceases to make me nauseous but, unfortunately, such acceptance has literally been forced upon us. Another notable example of lowering standards is the pitiful use of the word "DONE" !!! When I was learning English grammar as a child and as a teen, if we pronounced the word "THE" with the phonetic sounding of "THUH" we were immediately chastised and required to demonstrate clear understanding of the error. The same was the case for using the word "DONE" (which was an even worse sin) whereupon we were immediately chastised and sometimes punished if we had dared to say "I AM DONE" when asked if we had finished our meal. All of these examples of changes in acceptance of inappropriate uses of words and phrases have been pushed upon us by our society in the effort to accommodate those of lower intellectual levels. We desperately need to "CLEAN HOUSE" with regard to our spoken and written use of the English language. We need to "uplift" rather than "lower our standards" in our efforts to establish societal equality. Can I get a great big "AMEN" from those of us who agree … especially us English majors (you too, Garrison Keillor). Namaste.