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There is a typical grammar question I want you to think over.

In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.

When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.

Yes, the answer is to correct "graduates college" to "graduates from college." For 'graduate' is intranstive verb, as in "He graduated from the university last June."

However, in Webster's Learner's Dictionary, there's also a transtive usage.

c [+ obj] US informal : to earn a degree or diploma from (a school, college, or university)
▪ He joined the navy after graduating high school.

Since we are not so much grammarians as people learning English as a second langage, I think this question is improper. The question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in leaners rather than improving their ability to use English.

What do you think of my statement?

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Stenka25The A question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in learners
I don't understand. What are you afraid of? Exam questions?

Are you saying that you were asked that question, and in your answer you used "graduate" in its transitive form, as described in Webster's learning dictionary, and your teacher considered your answer incorrect?

CJ
I want to know whether this kind of question is proper or not.

I mean, in descriptive grammatical sense, this question seems wrong to me.

And I asked what do you think about my thought.

Thanks.
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Stenka25I want to know whether this kind of question is proper or not.
I assume this is the question you are referring to:

In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.

When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.


____________

This kind of question is proper. Yes. It is quite typical in an English course to be asked to correct the part of a sentence which is wrong.
____________
Stenka25I mean, in descriptive grammatical sense, this question seems wrong to me.
This particular question has a problem, which you have pointed out. Nevertheless, this type of question is very commonly seen.

CJ
Stenka25There is a typical grammar question I want you to think over.In the sentence below, correct the part which is wrong.▪ When he graduates college he will have to decide whether to continue his studies or seek employment.Yes, the answer is to correct "graduates college" to "graduates from college." For 'graduate' is intranstive verb, as in "He graduated from the university last June."However, in Webster's Learner's Dictionary, there's also a transtive usage.c [+ obj] US informal : to earn a degree or diploma from (a school, college, or university)▪ He joined the navy after graduating high school.Since we are not so much grammarians as people learning English as a second langage, I think this question is improper. The question of this kind only contributes to growing fear in leaners rather than improving their ability to use English.What do you think of my statement?Edit/Delete Message

I think your statement makes sense.

In some degree, such tests tame the learners to the safe usage of a word rather than encourage them to find more usages of it.
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