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Hi,

Would you please check for me if I have used these words correctly?


I am always checking and thinking my words use in the sentences. (Use here is a noun?)

I am always checking and thinking my words using in the sentences. (Can this be correct?)

I am averse that idea. (Against)

I have an aversion to that idea. (against)


Edit: Changed 'gramar' to 'grammar' in the header. CJ

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John AkiI am always checking and thinking my words use in the sentences. (Use here is a noun?) Not exactly. See below.

I am always checking word usage (when I write sentences).
I am always thinking about word usage (when I write sentences).

"word use" is also OK. And yes, 'use' is a noun here.

John AkiI am always checking and thinking my words using in the sentences. Not exactly. See below.

I am always checking my words when using them in sentences.
I am always checking my words when I want to use them in sentences.
I am always thinking about using words in sentences.
I am always thinking about how to use words in sentences.

John Aki

I am averse to that idea. 'averse' is an adjective. (Against)

I have an aversion to that idea. 'aversion' is a noun. (against)

It isn't exactly 'against'.

averse: having an active feeling of repugnance, dislike, or distaste —usually used with to

Aversion is when you prefer to avoid something because you have a strong feeling of dislike about it, even if you can't explain this feeling. People who can't swim may have an aversion to being in deep water or to going out to sea on a boat. People who have never eaten certain foods may have an aversion to those foods.

CJ

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Comments  
John Akiwords use
John Akiwords using

Use word usage.

John Akiam averse

wrong. be averse to something.

John AkiI have an aversion to that idea. (against)

correct

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thanks Sir~

Hi Mr CJ,

Would you please comments on these questions? appreciate it.


I dislike swimming. (generally speaking, just share the idea, more or less in conversations)

I am averse to swim or swimming. (emphasize that I really don't like swimming either by nature (feeling) or I can't swim)

Many people have aversions to needles by nature.

This poison caused two people died so far. ("Died" here is an adjective?)

Be careful, as It may cause people (to) die. ("To" can be optional here?)


Thanks in advance

John Aki

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John Aki

I dislike swimming. (generally speaking, just share the idea, more or less in conversations) OK.

I am averse to swim or swimming. (emphasize that I really don't like swimming either by nature (feeling) or I can't swim) OK.

averse to swimming

Many people have aversions to needles by nature. OK. The plural is less used, however. You are more likely to hear "have an aversion to needles".

This poison caused two people died to die so far. ("Died" here is an adjective?) "died" is a verb form, but not the correct verb form here.

Be careful, as It may cause people (to) die. ("To" can be optional here?) No. "to" is required. You cannot omit it.

In one grammatical pattern "cause" takes a noun phrase (NP) and a full infinitive (infinitive with 'to'). This is probably the most important pattern for the verb "cause".

This poison caused [two people]NP [to die]inf so far.

More examples:

It could be this virus that causes [the brain]NP [to age]inf.
This will cause [alarm bells]NP [to start]inf ringing.
A power failure caused [valves to a storage tank]NP [to open]inf, and the tank overfilled.
The rebound of the economy from the recession has caused [small stocks]NP [to surge]inf.
The hurricanes caused [nearly all the oysters]NP [to die off]inf in the area.

CJ

Thank you Mr CJ,

Can't express how much we love your comments. As it always comprise with teachings, rather than just brush us off with simple answers.


Regards,

John Aki

Are you able to translate the example sentences into Japanese fairly easily?

CJ

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No really, not because of grammar, more largely the concept is totally different. When we use English we have to think the way English is.

We don't have "perfect tense" or "past simple"...etc. Only one tense, which is "present simple" then we use "date, time, yesterday, this morning, tomorrow...etc" to describe when. All Asian languages are working this way, we all from China originally anyway, which means no grammar as well.

Most importantly our wordings are far less than English, not such as "high registered or educated words".

Just a simple word "pain" represents all, of course we add how pain, very or not very pain. English looks easy at the beginning with only 26 letters. But when adding grammar and wordings in, it is far difficult than we think it is. It really tasks a brain to make it right, not to mention perfect it.

This is probably why our dictionaries can't consist, they all interpret slightly different. Anyway thanks for your effort and time here. See you soon in the next pose.


Regards,

John AKi

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