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Hi all,

My native language is Chinese and I am learning English as a foreign language. I am wondering if you could name a few mistakes that are commonly seen in Chinese people who speak/write English as a second language, so that I can be more conscious in avoiding them in the future.

Any advice (relating to gramma) will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Best Regards,

- HBLaw
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Comments  
The most common one I see/hear is the omission of articles.
Yep, no articles. Lots of tutorials on the net are written this way:

Put files in folder named "Libraries". Then open a text editor and open file you just created.

Also: using "to be" instead of "to do":

Where are you live? Are you live in China? (should be "Where do you live? Do you live in China?")

Emotion: smile
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HblawHi all,

My native language is Chinese and I am learning English as a foreign language. I am wondering if you could name a few mistakes that are commonly seen in Chinese people who speak/write English as a second language, so that I can be more conscious in avoiding them in the future.

Any advice (relating to gramma) will be greatly appreciated!

Thanks!

Best Regards,

- HBLaw



Well, I think this is right up my alley, so to speak. Speaking from experience, the most common problem for Asian learners, including Chinese are the followings:

In writing:

Capitalization

Third person/ singular rule

Gender (he/ she)

Space

Punctuations

Incorrect choice of word

Grammar Structure

Speech-wise:

Awkward Accent

Frequent Iteration

Unclear or incorrect pronunciation

Change of gender in mid conversation, i.e. switching he to she or vise versa.

Mixed grammar
Right. When I read your responses, I realize that these errors occur very often in my own writing/speaking.

For example, confusion of "he" and "she": it often happens in speaking, because in Chinese "he" and "she" has the same pronounciation.

Incorrect choice of words may be a result of the way that Chinese students build their English vocabulary - by studying words with bad dictionaries designed for test preparation (like for GRE). You may often hear a Chinese student complain that he/she has never met the words he/she studied during the preparation for GRE (or some other tests) again.

BTW, Goodman, I can't quite understand the item "space" listed in your post - can you elaborate a little bit?

Thanks!
I'd say that your English is already extremely good. Emotion: smile
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Hi Hblaw,

"Space" is the "space" between words when typing on the keyboard. I see that a lot in high school level student's writing. Gender mix up and plural to singular are the most common. I had to work very hard to keep from making these mistakes. You are right about he and she sharing the same pronoun between in Chinese. That's why it is a problem for Chinese leaners. I share GG's opinion about your English. That doesn't mean that there isn't anymore room for improvment.
Thanks a lot! It is encouraging.

I currently work in an international law firm in Beijing. In my work the standard for English is quite stringent. I have to be extremely careful in writing - that's why I asked in the first place. I need to be conscious of the "frequently made mistakes." I'd think I have a LOT to improve. (E.g. in my post above, I used "'he' and 'she' has ...").

Previously I focused mainly in substance when writing; now I think it is time to fix the grammar.
Thanks a lot! It is encouraging.

I currently work in an international law firm in Beijing. In my work the standard for English is quite stringent. I have to be extremely careful in writing - that's why I asked in the first place. I need to be conscious of the "frequently made mistakes." I'd think I have a LOT to improve. (E.g. in my post above, I used "'he' and 'she' has ...").

Previously I focused mainly in substance when writing; now I think it is time to fix the grammar.
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