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Dear Group,

Which one of these two sentences below is correct?

1. Do anyone know at what time did we come here?

2. Do anyone know at what time we came here?

Please advise, thank you.

Regards,

Jeeva
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Comments  (Page 2) 
No, I didn't know that, Paco. Thank you! Emotion: smile
thnx now it is clear.

and here comes another question. (as you see i understand Emotion: stick out tongue Emotion: smile )

alive or live? i dont mean the verb meaning of live . i mean the adj meaning of both them.

is there a difference between them ? alive(adj) vs. live(adj)
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The adjective "live" has various meanings. "Live" in "a live TV program" is "being performed before audience" (="not recorded"). "Alive" means "living"(="not dead") or "active".

paco
filled and fulled

Emotion: tongue tied

for an instance, the glass get filled or get fulled ......
Filled. "Full" is not used as a verb.
Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
Full \Full\, v. i.
To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well.
[1913 Webster]
AnonymousFull \Full\, v. i.
To become fulled or thickened; as, this material fulls well.
[1913 Webster]
Oops .. thanks for pointing out. "Full" can indeed be used as verb but in this case, the right answer is still "filled". For more information on what "full" means as a verb, check a good dictionary. Emotion: smile
thnx.

but it is aprroximately same according to the dictionaries.

iwant to learn it from different usages.

could you make sentences with full and fill
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Anonymous has given a usage of "full" from Webster:

This material fulls well.

I had a look and it seems full is normally used with materials or cloth. In the sentence you gave it was trying to say "pouring something into the glass to make it full". In this case "filled" is the right word.

I think the dictionaries have it quite clear though.
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