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Hello everyone,

Are the following sentences correct?

1. George is 18 years old who is a student.

2. George is 18 years old, who is a student.

I think they are wrong.

The correct version is:

George, who is a student, is 18 years old.

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You are quite right!

You could also make it:

George, who is eighteen years old, is a student.

Note that most style guides will say that numbers, at least up to twenty, should always be written in words.

Comments  
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David HattonNote that most style guides will say that numbers, at least up to twenty, should always be written in words.

There are even recommendations to write numbers up to 100 in words!

That's going a bit far, I'd say. And I've never heard 20 as the limit either.

My favorite bit of advice on this topic is to write out one-digit numbers in words, and use numerals for everything else. Anything with units (9 inches, 5 years old, 4 light years, etc.) is an exception. Here are a few links on this subject for anyone who's interested:

https://www.scribendi.com/academy/articles/when_to_spell_out_numbers_in_writing.en.html

https://www.scribbr.com/academic-writing/numbers/

https://grammarist.com/grammar/writing-numbers/

CJ

I got told that by a headmaster I worked under who was a proofreader; I just took it as read!

Any idea what style guide he was following?

CJ

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David HattonYou are quite right!You could also make it:George, who is eighteen years old, is a student.Note that most style guides will say that numbers, at least up to twenty, should always be written in words.
Thanks a lot.

This was over twenty years ago - I don't know whether he is even around these days. He seemed to have a clear view and this was what he used in his work. Quite likely it was something from a long, long time ago!

Oh. OK. I was just wondering.

Thanks.

CJ

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