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Dear sir,

I want to a ask one question.

1) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would have tired today.

2) if I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired today.

Which one is correct and what is difference between two sentences.

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ritik1) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would have been tired today.
2) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired today.

I'm pretty sure you intended to put 'been' in your first sentence. That way, both are correct.

The meaning is the same.

CJ

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1) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would have been tired today.

2) if I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired today.


But there should be some difference.

ritikBut there should be some difference.

How do you figure that?

The scope of time is too narrow. Both the time of the imagined cause and the time of the imagined result are constrained by the adverbs 'yesterday' and 'today'.

Party yesterday; tired today.

Those adverbs of time somewhat cancel out the usual connotations we have with those tenses.


Are you familiar with the three types of conditionals and the mixed conditionals? It would help if you were.


Anyway, if you follow the usual sequence of tenses for conditionals, you could have a second and a third conditional here. Omitting the interfering adverbs, they would go like this:

Second: If I went to the party, I would be tired.
(Supposing I do go to the party — in the future— and I don't know for certain yet whether I will go — I will be tired as a result — even farther in the future. Maybe that's why I don't really want to go to the party.)

Third: If I had gone to the party, I would have been tired.
(Supposing I did go to the party — in the past — and I did not go — being tired would have been the result — not so far in the past — but it wasn't the result because I didn't go.

Both of those above are hypothetical if-statements. The so-called second conditional is for a present or future which may or may not happen; the third conditional pattern is for a past that definitely did not happen.

Both talk about imagined things. Neither pattern is about actions or events that actually happen, will happen, or did happen in the real world. We are just sitting in our armchairs talking about things that might happen and guessing what results might come about. We may as well be talking about what we would spend the winnings on if we won the lottery.


Since you have used 'today' in the clauses that talk about envisioned results, there is no difference in the timing of the result. The only tiny difference someone might be able to point out is that "would have been tired today" might sound to some listeners just a little bit sooner in the day than "would be tired today". In ordinary day-to-day usage, no one would stop to analyze such sentences in enough detail to perceive that tiny difference.

CJ

Dear sir,

You have been of a great help,brother.

So if I want to write the sentences properly ( perfectly) Then , I would write like this.

1) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would have been tired (today).

2) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired (now).

These sentences above sound more perfect and clear . Is that correct ?

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ritikSo if I want to write the sentences properly

Only the first sentence properly says what you want to say, assuming you are talking about a party you did not go to.

1) If I had gone to the party yesterday, I would have been tired (today).

The proper form for your second sentence is

2) If I went to the party (tomorrow), I would be tired (the day after tomorrow).

but that's for a party you have not yet gone to.

CJ

Hello sir

But I can say like this also.

1) if I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired now .

Is that correct ?

ritikBut I can say like this also.1) if I had gone to the party yesterday, I would be tired now .Is that correct ?

Yes. That's fine. It's called a mixed conditional. The if part is in the past, and the second part is in the present. This combination is fairly common.

If I had learned to play the trumpet years ago when I had the chance, I would be able to help you with your trumpet lessons now.
If we had begun to work toward a post-carbon economy 25 years ago, we would be much more secure today, both economically and militarily.
If you had bought that house on Maple Street, what would it be worth today?

CJ

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Dear calijfilm,


You have been of a great help, now I understood all the rules of conditional sentences. I wish I could pay you money for that. Thanks a lot. God bless you.

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