+0

Hello everyone,

Could you please tell me if it is natural to use "themselves" in the following sentence?

They took themselves to hospital.

Regards,

Joseph

+1
Joseph ACould you please tell me if it is natural to use "themselves" in the following sentence?

It is good English, of its kind—literary. It is British, at least, because an American would say "to the hospital". But no American I know would ever say it that way, using "themselves". They went to the hospital, which defaults to going there for treatment. I can't speak for the Brits.

+0
Joseph AThey took themselves to a hospital.

That is fine in American English. It means that the people were well enough, and approved to drive there (and back).

This is not a common situation, though. Usually if you are scheduled for outpatient surgery, even if it requires no anesthesia, the doctors want someone else to drive you back home. Perhaps for a minor procedure like a CT scan or biopsy, you would drive yourself to (a / the) hospital where they have the proper equipment.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
+0
Joseph A

Hello everyone,

Could you please tell me if it is natural to use "themselves" in the following sentence?

They took themselves to hospital.

Regards,

Joseph

THat's fine in BE.

+0

Let's consider the sentence pattern:

Question: How did you get to the hospital?

Answers:

My mother took us.
The #34 bus took us..
A kindly gentleman took us.
A taxi took us.

When the subject and object are the same, we use the reflexive form.

X We took us.

We took ourselves.

+0
Joseph A

Hello everyone,

Could you please tell me if it is natural to use "themselves" in the following sentence?

They took themselves to hospital.

Regards,

Joseph

It's fine.

Found online:

The victim suffered a large cut to his head and took himself to Jewish Hospital.
Chamberlain took himself out of the game in the fourth quarter and never returned.
It may explain why Pam took herself to the emergency room recently.
We took ourselves to business school and learned the ins and outs of the business.
On Saturday night, Marty and I took ourselves to a choral concert downtown.
Several residents took themselves to hospitals for smoke inhalation, Hynes said.
The three took themselves to University of Chicago Medical Center after the shooting, according to police.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
1 2
Comments  

I'm not sure but, It doesn't sound that natural. Why don't you just say "They go to the hospital."? Or "They go to the hospital by themselves." Or if for some reason, I want to emphasize my saying, I think I can say "They went to the hospital themselves."

I hear this term "I gather myself", though.

Thank you so much, anonymous and Moonrise.

In my native language, too, we don't use "themselves" there. I hope a British native speaker gives their view on this post. I only had problem with "themselves". I know both "to hospital" and "to the hospital" are correct.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

In my native language, we use such terms in "slang" in some cases, but not something that we use typically. Even in the official language (not slang), it can be used in literature and writing in some cases.

In English, it doesn't sound natural to me because I don't hear it. So, I'm not familiar with it.

In my language, when we use such terms, there is something that makes it different but it's hard for me to clarify it. I don't know whether it's the same in English. I'll state a case where this term can be used in my native language.

Example 1:

Family members might have an argument. They discussed a topic and everyone talked and interacted. I felt like the discussion is unfruitful. So, I took myself and got out.

When using "Myself" in that context above, It's like to distance myself from getting involved into more drama.

Example 2:

Alan suddenly felt sick. He was too tired. He needed someone to take him to the hospital. Unfortunately, at the time, nobody was there. He called his brother, but the streets were locked. He called his friend, but his phone was dead. It was just an unfortunate day.

When he reported his story for others, he could say, "I was too tired, I couldn't find anyone, so I took myself and went to the hospital"

It's like to carry the burden of himself and go to the hospital alone. I may not use the accurate term, though.

These are some cases based on my native language. I'm not sure whether it's the same with English.

MoonriseIn my native language, we use such terms in "slang" in some cases, but not something that we use typically. Even in the official language (not slang), it can be used in literature and writing in some cases.In English, it doesn't sound natural to me because I don't hear it. So, I'm not familiar with it. In my language, when we use such terms, there is something that makes it different but it's hard for me to clarify it. I don't know whether it's the same in English. I'll state a case where this term can be used in my native language. Example 1: Family members might have an argument. They discussed a topic and everyone talked and interacted. I felt like the discussion is unfruitful. So, I took myself and got out. When using "Myself" in that context above, It's like to distance myself from getting involved into more drama. Example 2:Alan suddenly felt sick. He was too tired. He needed someone to take him to the hospital. Unfortunately, at the time, nobody was there. He called his brother, but the streets were locked. He called his friend, but his phone was dead. It was just an unfortunate day. When he reported his story for others, he could say, "I was too tired, I couldn't find anyone, so I took myself and went to the hospital" It's like to carry the burden of himself and go to the hospital alone. I may not use the accurate term, though. These are some cases based on my native language. I'm not sure whether it's the same with English.

Thanks a lot, Moonrise, for the explanation.đź‘Ť

 AlpheccaStars's reply was promoted to an answer.
Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.
AlpheccaStars
Joseph AThey took themselves to a hospital.

That is fine in American English. It means that the people were well enough, and approved to drive there (and back).

This is not a common situation, though. Usually if you are scheduled for outpatient surgery, even if it requires no anesthesia, the doctors want someone else to drive you back home. Perhaps for a minor procedure like a CT scan or biopsy, you would drive yourself to (a / the) hospital where they have the proper equipment.

Thanks a lot, AlpheccaStars.

In British English, the article "a" or "the" can be dropped in my sentence. My problem was the word "themselves". I thought it was not natural and wrong.

Joseph AIn British English, the article "a" or "the" can be dropped in my sentence.

Correct. BrE does not add the article.

Joseph AMy problem was the word "themselves". I thought it was not natural and wrong.

I do not believe there is any difference in American and British English in the use of the reflexive pronoun..

Show more