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I have a question. In the following conversation, I wonder if 'wouldn't' instead of 'didn't' is grammatically correct. If 'wouldn't' is correct, is there the difference between them?

A: If you got rid of your social media apps, you’d have so much more free time because you wouldn’t be constantly looking at your phone.

B: That’s true. I do spend a lot of time on social media, especially in bed. If I [didn’t/wouldn’t] do that, I could read or even just get to sleep earlier.

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Juniper Kim 1354If I [didn’t/wouldn’t] do that

You need "didn't".

General rule: Don't use 'will' or 'would' in an if-clause.
(There are very few exceptions.)

CJ

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Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

I sincerely appreciate your quick and detailed answer.

CalifJimGeneral rule: Don't use 'will' or 'would' in an if-clause.(There are very few exceptions.)

We'd save a lot of money if you would cycle to work.

If you would / will be so kind as to do that, I'd be happy to reimburse you.

If you won't do it, I will!

We would love it if you would come and stay with us.

I'd really appreciate it if you would settle up with me.

If you would care to behave yourself for once, I might just reconsider.

If you will hand in your assignment, I will grade it.

anonymousWe'd save a lot of money if ...

And your point is?

CJ

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CalifJim
anonymousWe'd save a lot of money if ...

And your point is?

CJ


The examples I gave are grammatically correct and common enough, yet they seem to violate the advice you gave in your answer.

anonymousThe examples I gave are grammatically correct and common enough, yet they seem to violate the advice you gave in your answer.

Yes. That's what "exception" means. Almost all of them fit into one of two types of exception.

1) bargaining or reciprocal benefits

I'll buy the pizza if you'll buy the beer.

2) indirect questions

I didn't know if he would want the car on Sunday or not.

You might include a third type, which has politeness formulas.

If you would like to substitute something else for the salad, we can do that for you.

CJ

CalifJim
anonymousThe examples I gave are grammatically correct and common enough, yet they seem to violate the advice you gave in your answer.

Yes. That's what "exception" means. Almost all of them fit into one of two types of exception.

1) bargaining or reciprocal benefits

I'll buy the pizza if you'll buy the beer.

2) indirect questions

I didn't know if he would want the car on Sunday or not.

You might include a third type, which has politeness formulas.

If you would like to substitute something else for the salad, we can do that for you.

CJ

Conditionals cover a wide range of meanings. The examples I gave and your ex 1. are not exceptions, but typical of the very common uses of conditional clauses. To say they are 'exceptions' is thoroughly misleading.

I don't know why you give an example of an embedded question. The OP seemed to be asking about conditionals, at least their example would indicate that.

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anonymousTo say they are 'exceptions' is thoroughly misleading.

The exceptions I gave were exceptions to the rule I stated. I don't think anything could have been clearer.

CJ

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