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Hello everyone,

Could you please give me some sentence examples where "try+verbing" isn't interchangeable with "try+to infinitive"?

I have some examples where "verb+ to infinitive" isn't interchangeable with "try+verbing". For example:

1. We try to work hard as soon as we possible.

2. We must try to stop climate change (from) getting worse.

3. We must try to get out of this huge forest.

4. We must try to get out of this huge forest before it is dark.

I think in the above sentences, there is an obligation, that's why we can't use "try+gerund". Is that right?

PS. I've added "from" to #2. Is that sentence with or without "from" correct?

Regards,

Joseph

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Joseph A1. We try to work hard as we possibly can.

It is an objective or a goal.

Joseph AWe must try to get out of this huge forest.

An objective or goal.


Let's try to open the window. It has been stuck. (an objective - to get the window open)

It's really stuffy and hot in here. Let's try opening the window. (It is an experiment to solve a problem)

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AlpheccaStarsas we possibly can.

Thanks a lot, AlpheccaStars.

I meant to write as follows:

We try to work as soon as possible.

Is it okay? Can we use "try working" instead?

AlpheccaStarsLet's try to open the window. It has been stuck. (an objective - to get the window open)

Can we use "ty opening" in the above sentence?

AlpheccaStarsIt's really stuffy and hot in here. Let's try opening the window. (It is an experiment to solve a problem)

AlpheccaStars, I think we can use "try to open" in that sentence. Is that right?

If it is okay to use "try to open" in that sentence, could you please give a sentence or some sentences where we can't use "try+ to base" instead.

I'm sorry to be a bother.

Regards,

Joseph

Joseph Aa sentence or some sentences where we can't use "try+ to base" instead.

You can always use either form and still have a grammatical sentence, so the grammar is not the problem. The problem is that if you use the wrong form after 'try', you might get the wrong meaning.


— What does 'perspicacious' mean?
— Try looking it up in this dictionary.

In the example above, if you say "Try to look it up in this dictionary", it won't make sense. It might make you think all the pages of that dictionary are glued together, and you'll have a real problem opening it. Emotion: smile


— A little screw fell off the toaster and fell inside it. I can't reach it to get it out.
— Try turning the toaster upside down and shaking it.

Here, "Try to turn the toaster upside down" sounds silly because anybody can turn a toaster upside down. It's not as heavy as a refrigerator! The point is that turning the toaster upside down is a possible solution to the problem of retrieving the screw.

CJ

CalifJimYou can always use either form and still have a grammatical sentence, so the grammar is not the problem. The problem is that if you use the wrong form after 'try', you might get the wrong meaning.— What does 'perspicacious' mean?— Try looking it up in this dictionary.In the example above, if you say "Try to look it up in this dictionary", it won't make sense. It might make you think all the pages of that dictionary are glued together, and you'll have a real problem opening it. — A little screw fell off the toaster and fell inside it. I can't reach it to get it out.— Try turning the toaster upside down and shaking it.Here, "Try to turn the toaster upside down" sounds silly because anybody can turn a toaster upside down. It's not as heavy as a refrigerator! The point is that turning the toaster upside down is a possible solution to the problem of retrieving the screw.

Thanks a lot, CalifJim.

My questions are:

1. In the following sentences, can we use "try+gerund?

A. We try to work as soon as possible.

B. We must try to get out of this huge forest.

C. We must try to stop climate change from getting worse.

I mean as follows:

A. We try working as soon as possible.

B. We must try getting out of this huge forest.

C. We must try stopping climate change from getting worse.

Or in AlpheccaStars' sentence as follows:

D. The door has been stuck. Let's try opening it.

2. Can we use "try+to base" in AlpheccaStars' sentence as follows?

It's hot in here. Let's try to open the window.

PS. I think almost all the sentences with "try+gerund" can be replaced with "try+to base". Is that right?

Regards,

Joseph

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Joseph A

A. We try working as soon as possible. NO

B. We must try getting out of this huge forest. NO

C. We must try stopping climate change from getting worse. NO

Joseph AD. The door has been stuck. Let's try opening it.

Let's try to open it makes more sense to me. Opening the door is not a possible solution for some other problem.

Joseph AIt's hot in here. Let's try to open the window.

Let's try opening the window makes more sense to me. You're trying to solve the problem of the heat. Opening the window is one possible solution to that problem because that will let in cool air. Therefore, try + V-ing.

Joseph AI think almost all the sentences with "try+gerund" can be replaced with "try+to base". Is that right?

Yes. That's just what I told you in my previous post. The grammar is fine in both cases. The meaning might be wrong, though, so that's why you have to be careful.

CJ

CalifJimLet's try to open it makes more sense to me. Opening the door is not a possible solution for some other problem.Joseph AIt's hot in here. Let's try to open the window.Let's try opening the window makes more sense to me. You're trying to solve the problem of the heat. Opening the window is one possible solution to that problem because that will let in cool air. Therefore, try + V-ing.Joseph AI think almost all the sentences with "try+gerund" can be replaced with "try+to base". Is that right?Yes. That's just what I told you in my previous post. The grammar is fine in both cases. The meaning might be wrong, though, so that's why you have to be careful.
Thanks a lot, CalifJim.