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Hello everyone,

Is it okay to use the stative verbs "need, like, hate, prefer, want, belong, love" with present perfect continuous as follows?

1. I have been needing someone to help me.

2. I have been needing some money.

3. I have been liking that girl.

4. I have been hating that boy.

5. I have been preferring tea.

6. I have been wanting a car

7. I have been wanting somebody to take me out of here.

8. The pen has been belonging to me.

9. This village has been belonging to that city.

10. I have been loving that book.

I think they are wrong.

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Sometimes stative verbs are used dynamically. It is highly dependent on the verb, and sometimes on the context.

1. I have been needing someone to help me. Emotion: yes The need has existed for some time.

2. I have been needing some money. Emotion: yes

3. I have been liking that girl. Emotion: no

4. I have been hating that boy Emotion: no.

5. I have been preferring tea. Emotion: no

6. I have been wanting a car Emotion: yes The want has existed for some time.

7. I have been wanting somebody to take me out of here. Emotion: yes

8. The pen has been belonging to me. Emotion: no

9. This village has been belonging to that city. Emotion: no

10. I have been loving that book. Emotion: yes This is used in casual conversation - you are in the process of reading the book.

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Joseph AIs it okay to use the stative verbs "need, like, hate, prefer, want, belong, love" with present perfect continuous as follows?

The use of a 'non-progressive verb' in a progressive (i.e., continuous) tense is almost always a "special effect", and that requires some special, unusual situation, so as you say, they are all wrong according to the grammar books.

The only one that I hear with any regularity is "I've been wanting a _____", and that's to say that I've often thought that it would be nice to have a _____, whatever it might be, usually something expensive.

Here are some examples I found online:

I've been wanting a dog for a while now.
I've been wanting a new pair of running shoes for months.
I've been wanting a length of cloth to make some new curtains.

You may find examples of the others online as well, but they are less used than the simple (non-continuous) forms.

CJ

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Thank you so much, AlpheccaStars and CalifJim.
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Excuse me CalifJim and AlpheccaStars, could you please tell me the meaning of the following sentence?

I have been having the car.

PS. I know that we can't use "have" with present perfect continuous when we mean "possession". Therefore, the above sentence is wrong. But I want to know if it means "I have been eating the car" as in "I have been having dinner" means "I have been eating dinner".

Regards,

Joseph

Joseph AI have been having the car.

This doesn't look grammatical to me. It's possible that someone said it just hoping it would be understood in the context in which it was said.

Maybe they meant that they have been driving the car or using the car in a context where the car is given to someone in the family for a while and then given to someone else in the family for a while, depending who needs the car more at any given time. Just guessing.

In any case, it's a weird thing to say. Neither fraze.it nor Google Ngrams finds any hits on that grouping of words. The hits you get on Google are mostly either by non-speakers of English or by students asking on various forums if that sentence is correct.


However, if you add a past participle, you have a causative construction, and that's possible:

I have been having the car washed at the carwash on Bramson Street.
I have been having the car serviced every three months at Giorgio's.

CJ

CalifJimThis doesn't look grammatical to me. It's possible that someone said it just hoping it would be understood in the context in which it was said.Maybe they meant that they have been driving the car or using the car in a context where the car is given to someone in the family for a while and then given to someone else in the family for a while, depending who needs the car more at any given time. Just guessing.In any case, it's a weird thing to say. Neither fraze.it nor Google Ngrams finds any hits on that grouping of words. The hits you get on Google are mostly either by non-speakers of English or by students asking on various forums if that sentence is correct.However, if you add a past participle, you have a causative construction, and that's possible:I have been having the car washed at the carwash on Bramson Street.I have been having the car serviced every three months at Giorgio's.

Thank you so much, CalifJim.

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