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Hello everyone,

Are the the following sentences correct?

1. I have waited for you for hours.

2. I have been waiting for you for hours.

I think both are correct. Is that right?

Regards,

Joseph

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Yes

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Joseph A1. I have waited for you for hours.

Sometimes you need more words (i.e., context) to establish the true meaning of these sentences.

This sentence seems to call for an iterative context. It's almost more like

I have had to wait for you for hours (on more than one occasion).

Examples:

There are times when I have waited for you for hours.
Every time we have agreed to meet for lunch, I have waited for you for hours.

Unlike in the continuous version, in this version the waiting does not necessarily last up to the time you say the sentence, though (by coincidence) it may.

To be sure that you convey the meaning that you are not still waiting when you say the sentence, use the simple past: I waited for you for hours (that day / that time / last Monday / etc.).

Joseph A2. I have been waiting for you for hours.

This works as an isolated sentence. You say this when the person you were waiting for finally shows up.

Any kind of activity that has been going on for a time and lasts up to the present moment is best expressed with the present perfect continuous. (Even waiting is regarded as an activity.)

I have been swimming for hours.
She has been reading for hours.
They have been working in the garden for hours.


These will all become a little different in meaning (as described above) when the simple form, and not the continuous, is used.

I have (sometimes) swum for hours.
She has read for hours (on occasion).
On fine summer days they have worked in the garden for hours.
~ They are known to have worked in the garden for hours on various occasions in the summer.

CJ

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Comments  

Thanks a lot, AlpheccaStars.

1. I have waited for you for hours.

2. I have been waiting for you for hours.

The first one means "I'm not waiting for you anymore or now, but the second one means "I'm still waiting for you". Is that right?

Regards,

Joseph

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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CalifJimSometimes you need more words (i.e., context) to establish the true meaning of these sentences.This sentence seems to call for an iterative context. It's almost more likeI have had to wait for you for hours (on more than one occasion).Examples:There are times when I have waited for you for hours.Every time we have agreed to meet for lunch, I have waited for you for hours.Unlike in the continuous version, in this version the waiting does not necessarily last up to the time you say the sentence, though (by coincidence) it may.To be sure that you convey the meaning that you are not still waiting when you say the sentence, use the simple past: I waited for you for hours (that day / that time / last Monday / etc.).Joseph A2. I have been waiting for you for hours.This works as an isolated sentence. You say this when the person you were waiting for finally shows up.Any kind of activity that has been going on for a time and lasts up to the present moment is best expressed with the present perfect continuous. (Even waiting is regarded as an activity.)I have been swimming for hours.She has been reading for hours.They have been working in the garden for hours.These will all become a little different in meaning (as described above) when the simple form, and not the continuous, is used.I have (sometimes) swum for hours.She has read for hours (on occasion).On fine summer days they have worked in the garden for hours.~ They are known to have worked in the garden for hours on various occasions in the summer.

Thanks a lot, CalifJim.

So my guess was wrong for #1😭😢.

Joseph ASo my guess was wrong for #1

A little wrong. As we say here, "Close, but no cigar". (You didn't win the cigar that was being offered as the prize.)

CJ

CalifJimA little wrong. As we say here, "Close, but no cigar". (You didn't win the cigar that was being offered as the prize.)

Thanks a lot, CalifJim.

CalifJimClose, but no cigar

Hmmm, I got its meaning in Google.

Regards,

Joseph

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