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Hello everyone,

Are the following sentences correct?

1. The race goes on for two days, and during these two days, the teams have to climb Ten of Datmoor's highest hills.

2. The race goes on during two days, and for these two days, the teams have to climb Ten of Datmoor's highest hills.

I'm sure #1 is correct, but I'm not sure about #2.

Regards,

Joseph

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Joseph A1. The race goes on for two days, and

'goes on' is a phrasal verb that means 'continues'.

We prefer 'goes on for {a period of time}' just as we prefer 'continues for {a period of time}'.

This part of the sentence is basically focusing on the degree to which the race extends in time. How long does the race take? It takes two days.

Joseph A2. The race goes on during two days, and

So this is not the preferred way of saying it.

Joseph Aduring these two days, the teams have to climb ten of Dartmoor's highest hills.

This part of the sentences is focusing on what happens within the time when the race is taking place.

Joseph Afor these two days, the teams have to climb ten of Dartmoor's highest hills.

In this version, the teams have to keep climbing those ten hills again and again for two days, just as when the doctor says, "To relieve the pain in your shoulder, you have to do these exercises for ten days". You do the same exercise again and again each day for ten days.

But if we tell a student, "During the next ten days, you have to take the English proficiency exam", we mean that within the time period defined by those ten days, the student must take the exam once, presumably on a day of his choice.

So doing something for (a period of) ten days is not the same as doing something during (a particular period of) ten days.

CJ

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Comments  
Joseph AI'm sure #1 is correct

Well, I'll bet you mean "Dartmoor", and "ten" should be lowercase, but yes.

Joseph A I'm not sure about #2.

"During" does not work there, and "for" means every second.

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anonymousWell, I'll bet you mean "Dartmoor", and "ten" should be lowercase, but yes.

Thanks a lot, anonymous.

anonymousshould be lowercase

Should it be "should be lowercased" or "should be lowercase"?

anonymous"During" does not work there, and "for" means every second.
Thanks a lot.
Joseph AShould it be "should be lowercased" or "should be lowercase"?

How dare you question the great and powerful Oz! Just kidding. That is how I've always used "lowercase", the adjective.

 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
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CalifJimgoes on' is a phrasal verb that means 'continues'.We prefer 'goes on for {a period of time}' just as we prefer 'continues for {a period of time}'.This part of the sentence is basically focusing on the degree to which the race extends in time. How long does the race take? It takes two days.Joseph A2. The race goes on during two days, andSo this is not the preferred way of saying it.Joseph Aduring these two days, the teams have to climb ten of Dartmoor's highest hills.This part of the sentences is focusing on what happens within the time when the race is taking place.Joseph Afor these two days, the teams have to climb ten of Dartmoor's highest hills.In this version, the teams have to keep climbing those ten hills again and again for two days, just as when the doctor says, "To relieve the pain in your shoulder, you have to do these exercises for ten days". You do the same exercise again and again each day for ten days.But if we tell a student, "During the next ten days, you have to take the English proficiency exam", we mean that within the time period defined by those ten days, the student must take the exam once, presumably on a day of his choice.So doing something for (a period of) ten days is not the same as doing something during (a particular period of) ten days.

Thanks a lot, CalifJim.

Could you please tell me why either "for" or "during" is correct in the following sentence?

She has often called home during/for the last three months. She always calls in the afternoon because of the time difference.

PS. I think "in" is correct, too. Is that right?

Regards,

Joseph

anonymousHow dare you question the great and powerful Oz! Just kidding.

😊


anonymousThat is how I've always used "lowercase", the adjective.
Thanks a lot, anonymous.
Joseph AShe has often called home during/for the last three months.

Frankly, 'during' seems better to me here because it's a particular three months, namely, the last three months. Personally, I would probably not use 'for' in this case.

On the other hand, I suppose people do sometimes use 'for' when they really mean 'during', so I can understand that both 'for' and 'during' are considered correct by some people. I can get confused about these words myself at times.

Joseph AI think "in" is correct, too. Is that right?

Yes, or even 'within'. 'within' is probably closest in meaning to 'during'.

CJ

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CalifJimFrankly, 'during' seems better to me here because it's a particular three months, namely, the last three months. Personally, I would probably not use 'for' in this case. On the other hand, I suppose people do sometimes use 'for' when they really mean 'during', so I can understand that both 'for' and 'during' are considered correct by some people. I can get confused about these words myself at times.Joseph AI think "in" is correct, too. Is that right?Yes, or even 'within'. 'within' is probably closest in meaning to 'during'.
Thanks a lot, CalifJim.
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