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Hi,

1) When you stand somewhere for a while because you're waiting for someone, you can say that you 'hover around'. I was wondering if there's a different expression for it that'd have the same meaning.

2) "My dog was running so fast to me that she had trouble bringing herself to a halt."

Can 'bring to a halt' be used here?

3) Can I say that my dog 'walks at a trot' when she walks quickly all the time? How would you describe the quick movement of her feet?

Thank you.

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Ann225When you stand somewhere for a while because you're waiting for someone, you can say that you 'hover around'.

Hmm. I've never heard that one. Emotion: smile

Ann225I was wondering if there's a different expression for it that'd have the same meaning.

Not that I know of. If you feel some impatience and begin to walk back and forth, you can say you were pacing, but that's not just standing.

Ann2252) "My dog was running so fast to me that she had trouble bringing herself to a halt."

This is OK, but to me it seems a bit too formal for 'had trouble stopping'.

"that she came to a screeching halt" is more for a vehicle, but it might be fun to use it for your dog.

Ann225Can I say that my dog 'walks at a trot' when she walks quickly all the time?

Sure. That's fine.

CJ

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Ann225'hover around'.

It's normally hang around.

Ann225Can 'bring to a halt' be used here?

Yes but, it's a bit formal and wordy. It would be simpler as stopping.

I didn't really want to use 'hang around', but thank you for suggesting it. 'Hover around' actually captures what I'm trying to say much better.

As for the example with 'bring to a halt', I didn't use 'stop' on purpose. I wanted to make it sound a bit more interesting because it was part of a funny story.