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regarding this sentence: " While I was getting ready,I listened to music".Is the first action to listen or to get ready?.1-In my opinion the action of getting ready is the first and it is interrupted by the action of listening.

2-Don't we have to put the verb "listen" in past continuous because it's a durative verb?.In other words, can't we say " while I was getting ready,I was listening to music" instead of he first example because The action of listening takes time?
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They both take time. I'd consider them to occur simultaneously.

It's more a question of context than of grammar, as I think you realize.

While I was getting ready, the lights suddenly went out.

While I was getting ready, the phone rang.

These are clearly interruptions, but the "getting ready" doesn't necessarily have to stop.

While I was getting ready, I heard a police siren.

While I was getting ready, the snow continued to pile up outside my door.
(simultaneous - We may assume the snow started first, but it's irrelevant, because the time frame begins with "while.")
I think saying that " While I was getting ready, the lights suddenly went out." is logical because the light doesn't take long time to go out.Like the sentence that I gave " while I was getting ready,I listened to music" ,your sentence as well as mine "While I was getting ready, the phone rang." seem to be confusing to me because so far as I know the verb " rang and listen" should be in past progressive because the action takes time.Could you explain more?
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Of course you have a point. It depends a lot on what you're listening to.

I heard the phone ring.
I listened to the phone ring.

With respect to time frame, they mean the same thing.

While I was getting ready, I listened to a record.
While I was getting ready, I listened to music.

This is contextual. In the first case we make no assumption about whether or not you continued to listen to the record during the entire period while you were getting ready. It could be a very short record or a very long one, and it may or may not continually replay. We happen to know these details about the things around us.
However, "listening to a record" is different from "listening to music." The first is an event and the second is an activity (arguably, of course.) It's natural to assume that you listened to music for the entire period. It's sort of cultural. We just know that that's what it means.

On the matter of using progressive tense for things which take time, I believe you have a mistaken idea here.

The second world war was fought between 1939 and 1944. (I have no idea if that's true.)

The second world war was being fought between 1939 and 1944.

I washed my car yesterday. I was washing my car yesterday.

We'd be in a big mess if we had to stop using past tense for things which take time.

I watched a movie last night. I was watching a movie last night. (no difference)

(Well, with the simple past we'd be more inclined to think you watched the whole thing.)

I was listening to the radio while I washed my car. (It's okay to mix and match.)

I listened to the radio while I was washing my car.

Of course you can't turn the argument around.

I broke my leg yesterday. I was breaking my leg yesterday.

You can't use continuous / progressive tense for things that don't take time.
everlastinghope1-In my opinion the action of getting ready is the first and it is interrupted by the action of listening

No, when we use the "while ..." structure, the general perception is that 2 actions are taking place as Avangi had told you in the reply.

If I said "I like to listen to my I-Pod while cooking dinner". What this statement implies is that the listening and cooking are happening at the same time with no particular details of which happened first. It could be that I turn on my I-pod first, or I start dinning first before the I-Pod. That said, I don't know how the word "interrupt" could have come into the picture.
everlastinghope
2-Don't we have to put the verb "listen" in past continuous because it's a durative verb?.In other words, can't we say " while I was getting ready,I was listening to music" instead of he first example because The action of listening takes time?

As far as this type of context is concerned, we can also say " while I was listening to music, I was getting dinner ready".

However, It must be pointed out that there are scenarios in which a particular action may preceed another. i.e.

While John takes the one-hour trains ride everyday to and from work, he either takes a nap or does his work on his computer. Here, the train ride preceeds the nap and computer work.
Goodman However, It must be pointed out that there are scenarios in which a particular action may preceed another. i.e.

While John takes the one-hour trains ride everyday to and from work, he either takes a nap or does his work on his computer. Here, the train ride preceeds the nap and computer work. Good point. [Y]
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everlastinghopeDon't we have to put the verb "listen" in past continuous because it's a durative verb?
No. That is not required in English. As explained by other forum members above, in English the durative meaning can be conveyed by the use of the simple past. The progressive (i.e., continuous) form is not required (even though it can certainly be used).

Nero fiddled while Rome burned.
George read a novel while Peter played the guitar.
While Larry played basketball with the kids, Louise made dinner.

Also, the clause that occurs with a while clause can express either a sudden event or a simultaneous activity.

While Gary was looking the other way, the thief hit him on the head with a shovel. [sudden event during the time Gary was looking elsewhere]

While Gary was looking the other way, the thief sneaked up behind him. [simultaneous activity]

CJ
Thank you so much for your explanation,though it's sometimes confusing whether to use past simple or past progressive when using while.I mean,I really have no idea whether to use past simple or past continuous in the second subordinate clause.
everlastinghope 2-Don't we have to put the verb "listen" in past continuous because it's a durative verb?
I think the problem is that you have the cart before the horse.
In the sentence, "While I was cleaning the shelf, I broke the vase," you can not put the verb break in the continuous because it is not durative.

You may put a durative verb in whichever tense suits your fancy. That is, you may use the tense as a tool to make the sentence mean what you want it to mean.
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