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I hope this will make you happy and this will not be forgotten.

If I shorten this, which one is right?

1. I hope this will make you happy and will not be forgotten.

2. I hope this will make you happy, and will not be forgotten.

3. I hope this will make you happy and not be forgotten.

4. I hope this will make you happy, and not be forgotten.

Thanks for your help!
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Comments  
Hello, Mariott,
mariott1. I hope this will make you happy and will not be forgotten.- correct; no comma before and when the subject of the second clause is ellipted, as shown by the materials in the Survey of English Usage.

2. I hope this will make you happy, and will not be forgotten.- correct, but less preferable because of the comma (in fact, much rarer than #1)

3. I hope this will make you happy and not be forgotten.- incorrect, the first verb phrase is positive, while the second one is negative; therefore, will should not be ellipted

4. I hope this will make you happy, and not be forgotten.- incorrect, comma + will

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff
Hi Mariott

I don't think any of those are actually wrong.
I would probably not repeat the word "will".
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I agree with Amy - none seem incorrect to me, though I would probably combine "will not" to make "won't."

It's true the comma isn't needed, but that the difference between what the rulebook says is correct (don't separate the subject from the verb with a comma) and using writing to read the way it would sound; there would naturally be a pause there, and the comma makes that clear.

(Grammar aside, I find it an odd thing to say. It sounds like it's something being given rather resentfully, with an unstated aspect that says "You'd better be grateful for what I'm doing for you.")
Grammar GeekI find it an odd thing to say.
The sentence struck me as being odd, too.

As for using the word "won't", yes, that's a good alternative.
Thanks Gleb Chebrikoff, Yankee, and Grammar Geek!
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Hi,

I hope this will make you happy and this will not be forgotten.

If I shorten this, which one is right?

1. I hope this will make you happy and will not be forgotten. OK

2. I hope this will make you happy, and will not be forgotten. OK

3. I hope this will make you happy and not be forgotten. No

4. I hope this will make you happy, and not be forgotten. No

Clive
The resulting four sentences all feature ellipsis and coordination of verb phrases. If we reconstruct the first two sentences to their original form, we'll get

I hope this [will make you happy] and this [will not be forgotten].

However, if we attempt to perform the same operation with the last two sentences, we'll get the following ungrammatical utterance:

*I hope this [will make you happy] and this [not be forgotten].

The reason is that we need to coordinate phrases of equal structure, namely, [will make you happy] and [will not be forgotten], and not [will make you happy] and [not be forgotten].

Respectfully, Gleb Chebrikoff
Gleb_ChebrikoffI hope this [will make you happy] and this [will not be forgotten].
No matter where you put the brackets, there is a non-negated verb in the first half (make) and a negated verb (not be) in the second half.

I hope [this will make you happy] and [this will not be forgotten]
I hope this [will make you happy] and this [will not be forgotten]
I hope this will [make you happy] and this will [not be forgotten]

The words "this" and "will" are repeated in all three of the bracketed versions above. We don't actually "need" to repeat either one of those words.

Elimination of the repeated words produces this:

I hope this will [make you happy] and [not be forgotten]

Emotion: wink
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