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Could you please explain the difference between these sentences?

1- "I'll be going on holiday this year",shouldn't we say" I'm going on holiday this year"?.Is the verb go in future continuous means that it's progressive and is going to take time?.does it have the same meaning as spend holiday?

2- I'll be getting my pansion soon".Don't we say " I'll get or I'm going to get my pansion soon"?,is the action of getting progressive and going to take time ?.

when exactly do we use the future progressive?,do we always mean that the action will take time in the future?.
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Comments  
As far as I know, the continuous future tense inidcates an action in the future that is interrupted in the future and is not correct here. Consider this example:

In the Simple Future, a specific time is used to show the time an action will begin or end. In the Future Continuous, a specific time interrupts the action.

Examples:
  • Tonight at 6 PM, I am going to eat dinner.
    I am going to start eating at 6 PM.
  • Tonight at 6 PM, I am going to be eating dinner.
    I am going to start earlier and I will be in the process of eating dinner at 6 PM.
So you should say something like:

I will go on holidays this year. (a prediction/promise)

I'm going to go on holidays this year. (a prediction/plan)

I will get my pension soon. (prediction)

I'm going to get my pension soon. (prediction)

and for the near future the present continuous is often used:

I'm getting my pension soon.

Wait for other answers too.
I found these examples "I'll be going on holiday this year" and I'll be getting my pansion soon" in New Headway's book which I think is a British book.Both sentences are true according to this book,but I didn't understand why we use the future continuous and not future simple.
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My view is that 'I'll be going / getting' is just a more enthusiastic expression of 'I'm going' or I'll go'. A major use of the progressive is to emphasize the durational activity and thus create more immediacy or more graphic imagery; it can also be more friendly (showing more interest) and/or more polite. Cf a polite waiter's enquiry: 'Will you be having wine with your dinner?'
everlastinghopeI'll be going on holiday this year ... I'm going on holiday this year
The first, in the future progressive, shows more excitement, more emotional involvement. Also, it places the focus on that future time in which the holiday will actually be taking place.

The second, in the present progressive, is more matter-of-fact. Also, the time focus is more diffuse, anywhere between now and the time of the holiday.
everlastinghopeI'll be getting my pension soon ... I'll get [my pension soon] ... I'm going to get my pension soon
Again, the future progressive shows more enthusiasm for the anticipated situation and places the focus on the future time when the pension will begin to arrive. The second version, in the simple future, is very matter-of-fact and almost belongs in the category of "official" language. The third, with going to, is somewhere in between.

CJ
Great, that explains a lot. Thanks guys!
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Hi,

I think that we could have another explanation for the Future Continuous here. It is also used to refer to a future activity that is one of a repeated series of events, or something happening regurarly on a given day, at a given time of the day, week, month, year, etc. For example:

You can give me Tom's books. I'll be seeing him tomorrow anyway. (He usually sees Tom on that day)
Leaves will be falling down in the autumn. (They always do)

The reading of the following examples would be:

1- I'll be going on holiday this year. ("this year" at the end doesn't quite fit this explanation unless it's one of those years that you go on holiday. Imagine that a person goes on holiday every even-number year, and since "this year" is an even number, they will be going on holiday. Emotion: big smile)

2- I'll be getting my pension soon. (The time of the month when he receives his pension is coming soon)

Michal
Thanks a million,Now it's getting clear for me but,
CalifJim
everlastinghopeI'll be going on holiday this year ... I'm going on holiday this year
The first, in the future progressive, shows more excitement, more emotional involvement. Also, it places the focus on that future time in which the holiday will actually be taking place.
Please have a look at these questions: which hotel are you staying in?, which hotel are you going to stay in ?, which hotel will you be staying in?,can the last question mean excitement for the person who's asking it?

MichalSHi, It is also used to refer to a future activity that is one of a repeated series of events, or something happening regurarly on a given day, at a given time of the day, week, month, year, etc.
which hotel will you be staying in?, does it mean that it is a repeated event for the person staying in hotel?
CalifJim
everlastinghopeI'll be going on holiday this year ... I'm going on holiday this year
The first, in the future progressive, shows more excitement, more emotional involvement. Also, it places the focus on that future time in which the holiday will actually be taking place.
everlastinghopeI'll be getting my pension soon ... I'll get [my pension soon] ... I'm going to get my pension soon
Again, the future progressive shows more enthusiasm for the anticipated situation and places the focus on the future time when the pension will begin to arrive.

CJ

what do you mean by "focus on the future time in which holiday will be taking place,and hen the pension will begin to arrive?

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