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There's an Algerian teacher who wrote English grammar book for his students,and he's living abroad.I had a look at his book and I found some grammar rules that confused me.Please could you check his writing and tell me whether he's right or wrong.Those in blue are not clear for me.

1-Each is used for both singular as well as plural nouns;for example

a-each country has a different flag= singular

b-we can choose between two questions but each of them are difficult.

2-The past tense of must is had to.

3-Unless is used only with the first type of condictional.

4-The passive form of these sentences are :

a-I think peter is telling you the truth= I think you are being told the truth by Peter.

b-David sent her his picture via internet=She was sent him picture via internet.

Many thanks
Comments  
If "unless" is really used only with the first conditional,can't we apply it for the third conditional ?

-I would have helped you if you hadn't insulted me=I wouls have helped you unless you insulted me.

Regarding the use of "each",can't we say instead of

-we can choose between two questions but each of them are difficult; we can choose between two questions but each one of them is difficult.
Sorry again,but one more question:

Does "unless" stand for if.........not or only if ?

Example : you'll miss the train if you don't hurry=you'll miss the train only if you hurry.

If "unless" means only if,I think We can't indeed use it in other types of conditional.Emotion: hmm
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everlastinghope b-we can choose between two questions but each of them are difficult.
"each" is singular, so it should be "each of them is difficult".
everlastinghope2-The past tense of must is had to.
"I must go" -> "I had to go".

Seems reasonable?
everlastinghope3-Unless is used only with the first type of condictional.
This is the straightforward case:

"If you don't have a licence, you can't drive" = "You can't drive unless you have a licence."

The version with "unless" is fine and the two sentences mean the same thing.

Beyond this, this question seems to get messy, opening up such possibilities as "You couldn't drive unless you had a licence" and "You couldn't have driven unless you had a licence". Probably the best thing is for you to write a sentence that you feel contradicts the alleged rule, and we'll take a look at it.
everlastinghope a-I think peter is telling you the truth= I think you are being told the truth by Peter.
Fine (apart from the capitalisation error). What other way of doing it did you have in mind?
everlastinghopeb-David sent her his picture via internet=She was sent him picture via internet.
It should be "She was sent his picture via the Internet."
everlastinghopeI would have helped you if you hadn't insulted me=I would have helped you unless you insulted me..
The sentence with "unless" is not right.
everlastinghopeDoes "unless" stand for if..not or only if ?
Example : you'll miss the train if you don't hurry=you'll miss the train only if you hurry.
If "unless" means only if,I think We can't indeed use it in other types of conditional.
Your example does not seem to be relevant to your question as it does not contain the word "unless".

"You'll miss the train unless you hurry" = "You'll miss the train if you don't hurry"

"You'll miss the train only if you hurry" means pretty much the exact opposite.
Hi ELH;

Please post your questions in separate threads. It is confusing to reply to three things at once....
everlastinghope1-Each is used for both singular as well as plural nouns;for example
a-each country has a different flag= singular
b-we can choose between two questions but each of them are difficult.
Your teacher gives examples of each. You understand each as singular. (a)

In (b), your teacher gives an example of each used as a plural referent. I don't use each as plural.

Each of the two questions is difficult.

everlastinghope2-The past tense of must is had to.


Present:
Sorry, I must leave now. I have to pick up my kids at school.

Past:
Sorry I had to leave so suddenly yesterday. I had to pick up my kids at school.
These say the same thing; but in different tenses.

everlastinghope3-Unless is used only with the first type of conditional.


Unless is the negative of if in type 1 conditionals:
Here is an example:

If you don't do your homework, you will fail the class.
Unless you do your homework, you will fail the class.

Please read ==this == about conditionals, type 1 (real possibility)
everlastinghope4-The passive form of these sentences are :
a-I think peter is telling you the truth= I think you are being told the truth by Peter.
b-David sent her his picture via internet=She was sent him picture via internet.
Have you studied the passive voice yet? This is where the receiver of the action is the grammatical subject in the sentence.

The first sentence illustrates the passive voice of the present progressive tense.
Here is another example.

The dog is biting the man. (Active voice)
The man is being bitten by the dog. (Passive voice)

The second example is incorrect.
David sent her his picture via the internet. (Active voice)
Correct: She was sent his picture via the internet. (Passive voice). It is not a good example, because the sender's name is not included, and his has no reference. I would use the active voice.
The alternative is very clumsy:
She was sent David's picture via the internet by David (himself).
everlastinghopeSorry again,but one more question:
Does "unless" stand for if..not or only if ?
Example : you'll miss the train if you don't hurry=you'll miss the train only if you hurry.
If "unless" means only if,I think We can't indeed use it in other types of conditional.
I feel 'unless' carries the meaning of 'except if' here rather than 'only if'.

If you say, 'Only if you hurry, you'll miss the train', then I think you would be actually encouraging your friend not to catch the train, right?

I've looked up your question on the usage of 'unless' in my reference book. It says the following:

We usually use if...not rather than unless in unreal conditional sentences.
  • If I weren't so tired, I'd give you a hand.
Regards,

- DJB -
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It is possible to use unless in the 2nd conditional:

I wouldn't eat beans unless I was (were) poor.
= If I was (were) poor, I would (have to) eat beans.

The were form (subjunctive) sounds a bit strange to me in an unless clause.
A-Emotion: stars