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I have some questions. Please anwer.

  1. In the first bracket of the conversation below, the word ‘which’ is grammatically correct instead of the word ‘that’?
  2. In the second bracket of the conversation below, I know the word ‘terrible’ is correct, but how about 'terrific'?

I wonder if the word ‘terrific’ in this conversation is correct in context. Because it has the meaning of ‘very bad or unpleasant; frightful’.

3. In the third and fourth brackets of the conversation below, which one is correct?

W: I read an article [which/that] as children are using digital devices more and more, they’re exposed to more fast food ads.

M: That’s true. And fast food marketers target children, too.

W: I know! It’s [terrific/terrible]. Fatty and sugary foods are so bad for anyone’s health, but especially for children.

M: Yes. Children are still developing and still learning about nutrition. They can be easily persuaded by ads, too.

W: They [do/be]. That’s why I think we need to regulate online fast food ads [targeting/to target] children.

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Juniper Kim 1354

I have some questions. Please anwer.

  1. In the first bracket of the conversation below, the word ‘which’ is grammatically correct instead of the word ‘that’?
  2. In the second bracket of the conversation below, I know the word ‘terrible’ is correct, but how about 'terrific'?

I wonder if the word ‘terrific’ in this conversation is correct in context. Because it has the meaning of ‘very bad or unpleasant; frightful’. Horrible, dreadful awful etc....are fine in this context. However, terrific is not because this word often has the opposite connotation.

3. In the third and fourth brackets of the conversation below, which one is correct?

W: I read an article [which/that] as children are using digital devices more and more, they’re exposed to more fast food ads. This sentence is syntactically flawed and semantically odd to my ear.

In most cases, which / that can be interchangeable. However, I'd suggest this version: I read an article about children being exposed to digital devices and fast food ads more and more. No relative clause to achieve the same meaning.

I read an article which said children are being exposed to digital devices and fast food ads more and more.

M: That’s true. And fast food marketers target children, too.

W: I know! It’s [terrific/terrible]. Fatty and sugary foods are so bad for anyone’s health, but especially for children.

M: Yes. Children are still developing and still learning about nutrition. They can be easily persuaded by ads, too.

W: They [can be]. That’s why I think we need to regulate online fast food ads [targeting/to target] children.

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Juniper Kim 1354I read an article [which/that] as children are using digital devices more and more, they’re exposed to more fast food ads.

'which' and 'that' cannot be used like this. You need to reword it. Changing the order of the clauses would also help.

I read an article that stated that children are exposed to more fast food ads because they're using digital devices more.

Juniper Kim 1354I know! It’s [terrific/terrible].
I wonder if the word ‘terrific’ in this conversation is correct in context. Because it has the meaning of ‘very bad or unpleasant; frightful’.

Use 'terrible'. This meaning that you found in a dictionary is hardly ever used in conversation anymore. It's mostly something you might find in a novel.

Juniper Kim 1354They [do/be]. They can. That’s why I think we need to regulate online fast food ads [targeting /to target] children.

You need the modifier form 'targeting' here.

'to target' forms an infinitive of purpose, so that gives the meaning that we need to regulate the ads in order to target children, which appears to have a meaning opposite to the desired meaning.

CJ

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