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Reposting since it's taking forever to upload my comment in my previous post -- possibly a bug.

Is the following sentence grammatically correct?


"From going on long hikes in the forest and mountains to being able to witness the stunning views of the American Rockies, to being able to see the few animals close up, and good company: it was all worth it."

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This is the third thread you have started with basically the same question. It is far better for you to add a new version as a reply or comment in the original thread, rather than starting all over again. I don't know why you had a problem. It's working fine for me. (Chrome browser, Windows 10)

Clive is correct in his remark about the "from... to" pattern. That is for two extremes, or a source and destination. Also, I assume that the animals were not your good company. Generally wild animals and humans keep their distance. I hope you didn't feed the bears!

Going on long hikes in the forest and mountains, witnessing stunning views of the American Rockies, seeing a few animals close up, and being in good company: it was all worth it.

I commented. It's awaiting approval.

So are you implying from...to is incorrectly used in my sentence? I have seen it used to include multiple events so was curious

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Juxtinfrom...to is incorrectly used in my sentence?

Do you mean like these examples, which I found in the first 20 sentences on fraze.it (of 294,758) when I searched for "from to to"?

USC owns the city, from Boardwalk to Park Place to the railroads.
Markets from India to Singapore to Russia had been on a historic tear.
They play a 10-game road trip that whisks them from Texas to Oakland to Chicago.
From Europe, to Asia to the Middle East, four billion people use them worldwide.
Culinary diversity now includes everything from Caribbean to Thai to Cuban food.
The agreement turns over 61 miles of tracks from DeLand to Orlando to Poinciana.
From Dickens to Steinbeck to Twilight, no twist ending is safe from destruction.
You'd hear the squeals of protest from Wall Street to Houston to Silicon Valley.
The rest came from around the world, from Switzerland to Britain to South Korea.

No. I don't think anybody uses that construction. Emotion: rofl

The only thing I'd change in your sentence is to use a comma instead of a colon; however, I really like A Stars' version, so I might use that one if I were you.

CJ

So my sentence is okay to use except I should replace - with ., yes?

Juxtin

So my sentence is okay to use except I should replace - with ., yes?

I don't see any -. Your best bet is to use the sentence A Stars wrote for you.

CJ

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.

Sorry. I meant to replace a colon with a comma, like you mentioned.
But isn't my original sentence okay though?

Juxtin

Sorry. I meant to replace a colon with a comma, like you mentioned.
But isn't my original sentence okay though?

I don't think Juxtin wants any advice about his English from teachers and native speakers. He only wants confirmation that he is right.
So just go ahead, Juxitn, and use whatever you want.

The only thing I'd change in your sentence is to use a comma instead of a colon;

Well, I was referring to the above comment which seemingly indicates the original sentence seems OK apart from this minor change

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