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Hello, I am sorry my page was deleted for some reason, I am not sure why. However,

can some one please revise this paper. I am sorry for distrubing you guys from your

work, but I need help. Please help. Paper is below. Please help thanks

in the eighteenth century was not a good place for anyone especially young children. Children during this time had to work as slaves. They had a job that no one wanted to do. Most of the children were forced to live in work- houses, because their parents could not afford to feed them. So to keep the children from starving to death, parents would sell their children to people who could feed them. Research concludes the same point. "Of every 1,000 children born in early 18th century , almost half died before the age of 2. Malnutrition, maternal ignorance, bad water, dirty food, poor hygiene and overcrowding all contributed to this extremely high mortality rate. And if an infant did survive, it then faced the perils of childhood namely malnourishment and ongoing abuse. Many poor children were dispatched to crowded, back breaking workhouses or were apprenticed to tradesmen who used them as unpaid laborers" (Black leaf 1).

Also the living conditions were terrible. Families would drink dirty water, and would leave their trash everywhere. The research that I did supports my opinion. " was filled with the smell of wet horses and the waste materials associated with them. Sanitation was unheard of. Water was unpurified, and raw sewage ran down city streets in open drains. It was common practice for people to empty their chamber pots out of their windows, and to leave garbage out in the street to rot" (Black leaf 1).

In the first stanza of the poem, the unnamed narrator is telling us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. The poem tells us that the narrator cleans chimneys and sleeps in dirty. In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when the master shaves his head. The unnamed narrator tries to comfort Tom. In stanzas three, four, and five Tom is dreaming. He dreams that an angel comes and unlocks them from coffins. They are laughing, happy that they can finally wash in the river and just be normally. However, the angel tells Tom that God will only take him as his son if he is good. When Tom awaked, he is happy to do his work.

My view of the poem is very simple. In the first stanza, the unnamed narrator did tells us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. He was so young he could barely say simple words. I believe that he is basically him introducing himself to the reader. The most important line in the first stanza is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep and in soot I sleep". I believe that he is talking to educated people in during the 18th century, and basically anyone who is reading the poem. The narrator thinks that anyone who can read are richer than people who can not read and do not have an education. During those times, educated people were the rich people.

In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when his owner shaved his curly hair. The owner shaved Tom’s head because when Tom is climbing up the chimney his hair gets dirty because of the soot. The narrator cares for Tom and tries to tell Tom that he will be okay. The narrator is like a friend to Tom. My view of stanzas three, four, and five is that Tom is dreaming. In Tom’s dream, he sees thousands of other young children dying from the job. The angel unlocks the coffins and the children are already dead. They probably died from the smoke or even starvation. The children were happy because they finally get to be normal kids. They get to swim in the river, and play. Tom was having a good dream. The angel gives Tom a lesson. The lesson was if he is good and does his duty as a chimney sweeper then his dream would come true. The angel is real life are the priests of the Catholic Church. The priests are tricking the kids into doing the labor. The priests just wanted them to do the labor. The priests of the Catholic Church are the angels in real life. Back in those days, priests were rich and their houses had a chimney and they needed the chimney clean. The priest told him that to make him fell happy doing that kind of labor.

Finally, in the last stanza, I believe that Tom wakes up happy. He is happy because of the dream. He figures if he behaves and does his job his dream will come true. Tom wants to live the dream, so he does his work as a chimney sweeper.

The irony of the poem is that we know what their life is going to be, but he does not yet know. Some of the complaints about the bad situations in at this time are very simple. One is when the narrator says “My father sold me" He does not like that his father sold him. Another bad situation is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep" This is a complaint because he is sleeping in dirty. Why would anyone want to sleep in dirty especially a young kid? Another is "Were all of them locked up in coffins of black" This complaint is about young children in a coffin. Who would wants to see their young child dead in a coffin. Who would want to imagine young child in a coffin? I do not think that anyone would want to see their young child in a coffin.
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daden1789Hello, I am sorry my page was deleted for some reason, I am not sure why. However,

can some one please revise this paper. I am sorry for distrubing you guys from your

work, but I need help. Please help. Paper is below. Please help thanks

London in the eighteenth century was not a good place for anyone especially young children. Children during this time had to work as slaves. They had a job that no one wanted to do. Most of the children were forced to live in work- houses, because their parents could not afford to feed them. So to keep the children from starving to death, parents would sell their children to people who could feed them. Research concludes the same point. "Of every 1,000 children born in early 18th century London, almost half died before the age of 2. Malnutrition, maternal ignorance, bad water, dirty food, poor hygiene and overcrowding all contributed to this extremely high mortality rate. And if an infant did survive, it then faced the perils of childhood namely malnourishment and ongoing abuse. Many poor children were dispatched to crowded, back breaking workhouses or were apprenticed to tradesmen who used them as unpaid laborers" (Black leaf 1).

Also the living conditions were terrible. Families would drink dirty water, and would leave their trash everywhere. The research that I did supports my opinion. "London was filled with the smell of wet horses and the waste materials associated with them. Sanitation was unheard of. Water was unpurified, and raw sewage ran down city streets in open drains. It was common practice for people to empty their chamber pots out of their windows, and to leave garbage out in the street to rot" (Black leaf 1).

In the first stanza of the poem, the unnamed narrator is telling us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. The poem tells us that the narrator cleans chimneys and sleeps in dirty. In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when the master shaves his head. The unnamed narrator tries to comfort Tom. In stanzas three, four, and five Tom is dreaming. He dreams that an angel comes and unlocks them from coffins. They are laughing, happy that they can finally wash in the river and just be normally. However, the angel tells Tom that God will only take him as his son if he is good. When Tom awaked, he is happy to do his work.

My view of the poem is very simple. In the first stanza, the unnamed narrator did tells us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. He was so young he could barely say simple words. I believe that he is basically him introducing himself to the reader. The most important line in the first stanza is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep and in soot I sleep". I believe that he is talking to educated people in London during the 18th century, and basically anyone who is reading the poem. The narrator thinks that anyone who can read are richer than people who can not read and do not have an education. During those times, educated people were the rich people.

In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when his owner shaved his curly hair. The owner shaved Tom’s head because when Tom is climbing up the chimney his hair gets dirty because of the soot. The narrator cares for Tom and tries to tell Tom that he will be okay. The narrator is like a friend to Tom. My view of stanzas three, four, and five is that Tom is dreaming. In Tom’s dream, he sees thousands of other young children dying from the job. The angel unlocks the coffins and the children are already dead. They probably died from the smoke or even starvation. The children were happy because they finally get to be normal kids. They get to swim in the river, and play. Tom was having a good dream. The angel gives Tom a lesson. The lesson was if he is good and does his duty as a chimney sweeper then his dream would come true. The angel is real life are the priests of the Catholic Church. The priests are tricking the kids into doing the labor. The priests just wanted them to do the labor. The priests of the Catholic Church are the angels in real life. Back in those days, priests were rich and their houses had a chimney and they needed the chimney clean. The priest told him that to make him fell happy doing that kind of labor.

Finally, in the last stanza, I believe that Tom wakes up happy. He is happy because of the dream. He figures if he behaves and does his job his dream will come true. Tom wants to live the dream, so he does his work as a chimney sweeper.

The irony of the poem is that we know what their life is going to be, but he does not yet know. Some of the complaints about the bad situations in London at this time are very simple. One is when the narrator says “My father sold me" He does not like that his father sold him. Another bad situation is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep" This is a complaint because he is sleeping in dirty. Why would anyone want to sleep in dirty especially a young kid? Another is "Were all of them locked up in coffins of black" This complaint is about young children in a coffin. Who would wants to see their young child dead in a coffin. Who would want to imagine young child in a coffin? I do not think that anyone would want to see their young child in a coffin.

I don't know anything about the poem and I cannot comment on how well you have represented its meaning. I'm going to highlight errors. I've used bold to ask questions.

London in the eighteenth century was not a good place for anyone especially young children. Children during this time had to work as slaves. Are you quite sure 'slaves' is the right term? They had a job that no one wanted to do. Most Do you think "most" is accurate? of the children were forced to live in work- houses, because their parents could not afford to feed them. So to keep the children from starving to death, parents would sell their children to people who could feed them. Research concludes the same point. "Of every 1,000 children born in early 18th century London, almost half died before the age of 2. Malnutrition, maternal ignorance, bad water, dirty food, poor hygiene and overcrowding all contributed to this extremely high mortality rate. And if an infant did survive, it then faced the perils of childhood namely malnourishment and ongoing abuse. Many poor children were dispatched to crowded, back breaking workhouses or were apprenticed to tradesmen who used them as unpaid laborers" (Black leaf 1).

Also the living conditions were terrible. Families would drink dirty water, and would leave their trash everywhere. The research that I did supports my opinion Is this your "opinion"? It seems factual, not something to have an opinion on. "London was filled with the smell of wet horses and the waste materials associated with them. Sanitation was unheard of. Water was unpurified, and raw sewage ran down city streets in open drains. It was common practice for people to empty their chamber pots out of their windows, and to leave garbage out in the street to rot" (Black leaf 1).

What is the transition between the background of London and the poem? In the first stanza of the poem, the unnamed narrator is telling us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. The poem tells us that the narrator cleans chimneys and sleeps in dirty. In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when the master shaves his head. The unnamed narrator tries to comfort Tom. In stanzas three, four, and five Tom is dreaming. He dreams that an angel comes and unlocks them from coffins. They are laughing, happy that they can finally wash in the river and just be normally. I haven't read the poem, but often "the river" if associated with angels would refer to The River Jordan, and has more meaning than just a river, which, if it were the 18th-century Thames, would be rather dirty However, the angel tells Tom that God will only take him as his son if he is good. When Tom awaked, he is happy to do his work.

My view of the poem is very simple. In the first stanza, the unnamed narrator did tells us that his mother died and his father sold him at a very young age. He was so young he could barely say simple words. I believe that he is basically him introducing himself to the reader. The most important line in the first stanza is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep and in soot I sleep". I believe that he is talking to educated people in London during the 18th century, and basically anyone who is reading the poem. The narrator thinks that anyone who can read are richer than people who can not read and do not have an education. During those times, educated people were the rich people.

In the second stanza, Tom is introduced. Tom cries when his owner shaved his curly hair. The owner shaved Tom’s head because when Tom is climbing up the chimney his hair gets dirty because of the soot. The narrator cares for Tom and tries to tell Tom that he will be okay. The narrator is like a friend to Tom. He is "like" a friend or is a friend? Or is he like a father? My view of stanzas three, four, and five is that Tom is dreaming. In Tom’s dream, he sees thousands of other young children dying from the job. The angel unlocks the coffins and the children are already dead. They probably died from the smoke or even starvation. The children were happy because they finally get to be normal kids. They get to swim in the river, and play. Tom was having a good dream. The angel gives Tom a lesson. The lesson was if he is good and does his duty as a chimney sweeper then his dream would come true. The angel is real life are the priests of the Catholic Church. Singular or plural? The priests are tricking You need to explain how this is a "trick." the kids into doing the labor. The priests just wanted them to do the labor. This is redundant. The priests of the Catholic Church are the angels in real life. Huh? Back in those days, priests were rich and their houses had a chimney and they needed the chimney clean. The priest told him that to make him fell happy doing that kind of labor.

Finally, in the last stanza, I believe that Tom wakes up happy. He is happy because of the dream. He figures if he behaves and does his job his dream will come true. Tom wants to live the dream, so he does his work as a chimney sweeper.

The irony of the poem is that we know what their life is going to be, but he does not yet know. Some of the complaints about the bad situations in London at this time are very simple. One is when the narrator says “My father sold me" He does not like that his father sold him. Another bad situation is when the narrator says, "So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep" This is a complaint because he is sleeping in dirty. Why would anyone want to sleep in dirty especially a young kid? Another is "Were all of them locked up in coffins of black" This complaint is about young children in a coffin. Who would wants to see their young child dead in a coffin. Who would want to imagine young child in a coffin? I do not think that anyone would want to see their young child in a coffin.

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Hi GG:
Grammar Geek don't know anything about the poem and I cannot comment on how well you have represented its meaning
Thanks for your input to Daden
Here is the poem he is writing about. It is hard to understand and comment on his essay without knowing the poem.

When my mother died I was very young,
And my father sold me while yet my tongue
Could scarcely cry ‘ 'weep! 'weep! 'weep! 'weep!’
So your chimneys I sweep, and in soot I sleep.

There’s little Tom Dacre, who cried when his head,
That curl'd like a lamb’s back, was shav'd: so I said
‘Hush, Tom! never mind it, for when your head’s bare
You know that the soot cannot spoil your white hair.’

And so he was quiet, and that very night,
As Tom was a-sleeping, he had such a sight!—
That thousands of sweepers, , Joe, Ned, and Jack,
Were all of them lock'd up in coffins of black.

And by came an Angel who had a bright key,
And he open'd the coffins & set them all free;
Then down a green plain leaping, laughing, they run
And wash in a river, and shine in the Sun.

Then naked & white, all their bags left behind,
They rise upon clouds, and sport in the wind;
And the Angel told Tom, if he’d be a good boy,
He’d have God for his father, & never want joy.

And so Tom awoke; and we rose in the dark,
And got with our bags & our brushes to work.
Tho' the morning was cold, Tom was happy & warm;
So if all do their duty, they need not fear harm