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HI there,

Could you check for me if I am correct in these patterns, please?


I would be excited to hear / hearing from you. (Both form are grammatically correct, very of perception but we tend to use ing form)

I would be looking forward to see / seeing you. (Same above)

I look forward to hear / hearing from you. (Same above)


Cheers

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John AkiI would be excited to hear / hearing from you.

I would say I would be excited to hear from you. You might come across I would be excited hearing from you, but I'd say it's awkward at best, and I wouldn't use it.

John AkiI would be looking forward to see / seeing you.

I would be looking forward to seeing you is fine.
I would be looking forward to see you and I would be looking forward seeing you don't work.

John AkiI look forward to hear / hearing from you.

I look forward to hearing from you is fine.
I look forward to hear from you doesn't work.

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Thank you Mr. Blue Jay,

Here is something I don't understand, could you please explain to me the reason behind?


I would be looking forward to hearing or seeing from you. (Ing form is fine here)

I would be excited to hearing or seeing from you. (Don't work, need a plain form)

I would be excited to hear or see from you.


Thanks in advance.

You're probably familiar with this, but I'll go over the basics quickly. When two verbs are linked together, the first will be in the form it would take if it were by itself (see, sees, etc.), and the other will be the full infinitive form (to see, to hear), or the gerund form (seeing, hearing), or the short infinitive form (see, hear). Which form is used for the second verb mainly depends on the part of the sentence that leads up to it, especially the first verb. Sometimes only one form can be used, and sometimes there is a choice. When there is a choice, the different forms may give the same meaning to the sentence (he likes singing, he likes to sing have the same meaning), or it may change the meaning (she forgot meeting him at the coffee shop (she didn't remember that it happened) she forgot to meet him at the coffee shop (she missed the meeting they had planned).

In the case of looking forward to , it is always followed by the gerund (-ing) form of the verb. Here to is a preposition, not part of the verb.

In the case of excited, it is most commonly followed by the full infinitive form of the verb, I would be excited to hear from you. Here, to is a participle, part of the infinitive. Excited can't be followed by to as a preposition, though, so you can't say excited to hearing, or excited to seeing.

Thanks for your interpretation Mr Blue Jay,


Can I conclude this "look forward to" is an expression with a special case follows by "ing" form, probably only one in the English world.

Most of the time "to" is always followed by plain form.


Will be happy to hear from you confirm again.

Aki.

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John AkiCan I conclude this "look forward to" is an expression with a special case follows by "ing" form, probably only one in the English world.Most of the time "to" is always followed by plain form.

Yes.

The reason is that the infinitives of verbs are usually expressed as to followed by the plain form of the verb, e.g.
to be
to have
to see
to hear

In this situation, to is a participle, and forms part of the verb.


To can also be a preposition, and as a preposition it usually points to the recipient, destination, etc. of the action of the verb, it links the verb to who-where-what.
Give (verb) it to Mary (who)
We are walking (verb) to the park (where)
I am looking forward (verbs) to meeting you (what)

In the last one, "meeting" is a verb, but it isn't part of the chain of verbs at the beginning of the sentence, am looking, and to isn't part of the verb "meet", it's a pointer connecting the earlier verbs to the "what" of the sentence, meeting you.

Thank you Mr Blue Jay.

I do admire your knowledge.


Aki from Japan