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Hi there,

Could you please check for me If I am correct in these meanings?


You are considered / regarded the best teacher in this school. (Both are correct, however "consider" is a better word choice?)

He has no respect / regard for other people's feeling. (Both are correct, however "respect" is a better word in here?)

I am writing to you relating / regarding to ____. (Both are equal good?)

Please convey my regard / greeting to your family. (Both are equal good?)


Cheers

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John AkiYou are considered / regarded the best teacher in this school.

considered OR regarded as

You are considered the best teacher in this school.
You are regarded as the best teacher in this school.

Both are equally good.

John AkiHe has no respect / regard for other people's feelings.

Both are fine, but 'regard' is a slightly higher register word.

John AkiI am writing to you relating / regarding to ____.

regarding [no 'to'] OR relating to

I am writing to you relating to the new community center on Elm Street.
I am writing to you regarding the new community center on Elm Street.

Personally, I would use 'regarding', but both are possible.

John AkiPlease convey my regards / greetings to your family.

Both are OK as long as you use the forms with "s".

John Aki

I am being considered for that job. (Passive) Yes. Good.

I have being considered for that job. (Passive, is this grammatical?) No. I have been being considered ...

Passive continuous tenses all start with one of the tenses of be.

I am, you are, he is, she is, we are, they are.
I was, you were, he was, she was, we were, they were.
I have been, you have been, he has been, she has been, we have been, they have been.
I had been, you had been, he had been, she had been, we had been, they had been.

Then you add 'being' and the past participle of the verb you want.

I am being considered, you are being considered, ...
I was being considered, you were being considered, ...
I have been being considered, you have been being considered, ...
I had been being considered, you had been being considered, ...

I am being taken seriously, you ...
I was being taken seriously, you ...
I have been being taken seriously, you ...
I had been being taken seriously, you ...

And so on. Those with 'have been', 'has been', and 'had been' are not used much. Too complicated! Too many words!

CJ

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Comments  

Also,

I am being considered for that job. (Passive)

I have being considered for that job. (Passive, is this grammatical?)


Cheers

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.



Thanks Mr CJ,

"And so on. Those with 'have been', 'has been', and 'had been' are not used much. Too complicated! Too many words!"

Totally agree with you~

English is a complicated language, so many words to learn and not to mention about grammar.

This is killing me. "wake/awake/waken"


John Aki

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
John AkiThis is killing me. "wake/awake/waken"

Personally, I get them all mixed up myself, and I'm a native speaker.

So I try not to use those words at all unless I really have to. Emotion: big smile

CJ

Thanks Mr CJ,

I saw someone writing these sentences, can you confirm me that they are wrong please?

The movies had started before we arrived. (Can't be past perfect)

I had finished it before you arrived.


The movies started before we arrived. (Correct without "had")

I finished it before you arrived.


John Aki

John AkiThe movies The movie had started before we arrived. (Can't be past perfect)

You have a choice between 'started' (past) and 'had started' (past perfect). Both are OK. So it CAN be past perfect if you wish.

John AkiI had finished it before you arrived.

Fine. I finished it before you arrived is also OK.

CJ

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Thanks,

But I thought, "Before, after, when" have to be "present sense" with a main clause?? can't be a perfect tense.

I cleaned my room before I went to school. (Past present sense only with a main clause)

therefore,

The movie started before we arrived. (Past present sense only with a main clause)

I finished it before you knew. (Same above)

Also,

Are these words making sense to you? or maybe you have better words for them?

He has a lot of friends, because he is liberal with his money.

He doesn't have any friend, because he is stingy / mean with his money.


Cheers

John Aki

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