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Hi there,

Could you please check for me if I am correct in these sentences ?


I can see it causes / causing problem. (Both are correct)?

I own / owned this car and always parked in my spot. (Both own and owned are correct?)

I own / owned this shop and operated myself. (Both own and owned are correct?)


Cheers

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John AkiI can see it causes / causing problem. (Both are correct)?

I can see (that) it causes a problem. -- This is talking about a general existing situation.

I can see it causing a problem. -- This is talking about an expected future situation, or (less common) talking about something that is happening right now, in front of your eyes

John AkiI own / owned this car and always parked in my spot. (Both own and owned are correct?)

Grammatically, yes.

"owned" would normally imply that you no longer own the car, while "this" implies closeness to the speaker, and would be more usual with "own". Of course, "owned this car" is possible in some circumstance, e.g. you are standing next to a car that you used to own. (It is also possible in a separate colloquial sense where "this" means "some".)

"own ... parked" doesn't seem a tremendously likely combination to need to say, but in the right context it is of course possible.

John AkiI own / owned this shop and operated it myself. (Both own and owned are correct?)

"owned ... operated" is OK; again, "owned" normally implies that you no longer own it.

"own ... operated" is grammatical but overall seems lacking in information. Normally one would say e.g. "I own this shop. I used to operate it myself, but now my daughter runs it."

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Thanks Mr GPY,

Good to see you again in here~

After reading your comments,, can I express in these ways?


I can see (that) it causes a problem. (A general idea)

I can see it causing a problem now.

I owned a car last year, not anymore.

I used to own a car but I sold it a year ago.

I own this car and always parked in here. (Still own it, a better sentence than "owned")

I owned a shop long time ago but...

I won this shop and operated myself. (A better sentence than "owned")


John Aki

I mean theoretically "own" is more correct for present, where as "owned" is more like referring to the past.


Cheers

John AkiI can see (that) it causes a problem. (A general idea)

"general idea" is not quite how I would put it. This sentence is talking about a present problem, often a recurring problem. For example:

"I'll ask her not to park in front of the gates in future. I can see (that) it causes a problem."

John AkiI can see it causing a problem now.

This could be used in different ways. It could refer to something that you see happening now, in front of your eyes, or it could mean that now you envisage a future problem.

John AkiI owned a car last year, not anymore.

This would be better with "but" inserted.

"anymore" is wrong in BrE (should be "any more"), but I believe accepted in AmE.

John AkiI used to own a car but I sold it a year ago.

Fine, though some people would put a comma after "car".

John AkiI own this car and always parked in here. (Still own it, a better sentence than "owned")

This is not a natural combination. You can say:

I own this car and have always parked (it) (in) here.
I own this car and always park (it) (in) here.

"in" is not normally necessary, and would not be used for a normal parking space. It suggests an enclosed space, such as a garage.

John AkiI owned a shop long time ago but...

OK.

John AkiI own this shop and operated myself. (A better sentence than "owned")

No. See my previous reply.

John AkiI mean theoretically "own" is more correct for present, where as "owned" is more like referring to the past.

You make it sound more vague or complicated than it actually is. "own" is present tense, and "owned" is past tense, nothing more than that.

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?

Thanks Mr GPY,

I forgot that "and" is a divider also a conjunction, please correct me if I am still worng.....


I own this car and always park it in my garage.

I own this car and have always parked it in my garage since I had bought the car.

I own this shop and (always) operate it myself.

I own this shop and have operated or run it myself since the shop had been opend.


John Aki

John AkiI own this car and always park it in my garage.

Fine.

John AkiI own this car and have always parked it in my garage since I bought the car.

This is grammatical as amended, but there are some issues. "the car" seems repetitious; usually we would say "it". Further, the whole part "since I bought the car" may be superfluous, given "always". If it is to be mentioned, it seems to need more emphasis to justify it. For example:

I own this car and have always parked it in my garage, ever since I bought it.

John AkiI own this shop and (always) operate it myself.

OK. (There may be slight issues with "always operate it", but I think these are beyond the present scope.)

John AkiI own this shop and have operated or run it myself since the shop opened / has been open.

OK as amended, but instead of repeating "the shop", we would often say "it"

Thank you Mr Mr GPY,

I am fully understanding these usages of "own/owned/have owned" now.

Do you mind checking two more sentences for me here please?


Before a holiday or vacation, we say to someone...

I hole that you have a great holiday and enjoy while visiting (in) London.


After a holiday or vacation, we say to someone...

I hope that you had a great holiday and enjoyed while visiting (in) London.


Thanks in advance

John Aki

Students: We have free audio pronunciation exercises.
John AkiBefore a holiday or vacation, we say to someone...
I hope that you have a great holiday and enjoy while visiting (in) London.
After a holiday or vacation, we say to someone...
I hope that you had a great holiday and enjoyed while visiting (in) London.

The parts that you highlighted are all correct in themselves. However, the part "... while visiting (in) London" is not correct. Firstly, we do not visit "in" a place, we just visit a place. Secondly, "enjoy" is transitive, so needs an object. Thus, we can say:

I hope that you have a great holiday and enjoy visiting London.
I hope that you had a great holiday and enjoyed visiting London.

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