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Hi,

Can you correct me if these sentences are grammatical to you, please?


I continue going to school and studying English.

I continue my lease contract with my landlord.

The weather remains/continue cold.

I will remain in the class after school. ( I mean staying in the class for an assignment)


Thanks in advance.

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John AkiI continue going to school and studying English.

OK.

John AkiI continue my lease contract with my landlord.

Grammatically correct, but it appears to have limited use in the simple present tense.

John AkiThe weather remains/continues cold.

OK. "remains" is more usual here than "continues".

John AkiI will remain in the class after school.

OK. Often "the" would be dropped in this case (idiomatic).

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Thanks Sir,

Can you tell me if these two words are the same meaning to you in these sentences, please?


I scraped/scratched my knee by thorns.

My knee was scraped/scratched by thorns.


Thanks again.

Also,

Are these two words sound correct in these sentences to you, please? which word is more common in general English to you?


That kind of the material crumble/crease easily.

A lot of the crumbles/creases in my suit.


Cheers.

Sorry I meant "Crumple"

That kind of the material crumple/crease easily.

A lot of the crumples/creases in my suit.

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John AkiI scraped/scratched my knee by on (some) thorns.
My knee was scraped/scratched by thorns.

"scratched" is more likely here. There is some overlap in usage, but "scratch" is usually used in connection with small sharp or pointed things. Thorns would be a good example. "scrape" is typically used in connection with hard surfaces, e.g. "As I was climbing the tree, I scraped my knee on the bark".

John AkiThat kind of the material crumples/creases easily.

I assume you mean "material" as in "cloth". "creases" seems more likely here, and has a clearer meaning that the folds remain visible in the material even after you try to straighten it out. In a sense, all cloth "crumples easily", so it is a bit harder to understand why you would mention that.

John AkiA lot of the crumples/creases in my suit.

This is not a full sentence. "creases" is more likely here, but in practice the two would be understood to mean about the same.

Thanks Sir,

Regarding to scrap/scratch, can I sentences as below,


Be careful when move that piano, don't scrap/scratch it. (Surface of the piano)

Worker scraped/scratched the piano. The piano was scraped/scratched by worker.

A lot of the scraps/scratches on that old car. (Surface of the paint)


Many thanks.

John AkiBe careful when you move that piano. Don't scrape/scratch it. (Surface of the piano)
A worker scraped/scratched the piano.
The piano was scraped/scratched by a worker.
A lot of the scrapes/scratches on that old car. (Surface of the paint)

"scratch" is the more likely choice in all of these.

The last of these is not a full sentence (has no main verb).

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Thanks Sir.