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Hi there,

Can you tell me if I am grammatical correct in these four sentences, please?


I graduate learning how to do it.

I am gradually learning how to do it.

Graduate increasing my water intake.

Gradually increasing my water intake.


Cheers.

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John AkiI graduate learning how to do it.

This does not work.

John AkiI am gradually learning how to do it.

This is fine.

John AkiGraduate increasing my water intake.

This does not work.

John AkiGradually increasing my water intake.

This is better than the prior attempt. But it still needs some changes. It needs "I am".

I am gradually increasing my water intake.

That is okay.

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MountainHikerI graduate learning how to do it.This does not work.

Excuse me, is the problem here related to the use of words (learn) or due to using (ing form) after "graduate".

If he/she said, for instance,"I graduate knowing how to do it", would it be fine?


Thank you

Thanks Sir,

Could you also advise me if these sentences are grammatical to you, please?


Sport means body is burning energy.

Sport means body burning energy. (No a conjunction here)

Sport means that body burns energy. (With a conjunction)


Thanks in advance

I saw your question earlier but I did not answer because I am not sure of how to answer your question.

I have not seen a definition of "sport" that means the body is burning energy. The body burns energy at rest too. Your body also burns energy when it is sleeping. Most of do not consider sleeping to be a sport.

If I ignore your definition of what sport means, then I can make some comments.

Sport means body is burning energy. (This does not work.)

Sport means body burning energy. (No a conjunction here) (This does not work.)

Sport means that body burns energy. (With a conjunction) (This works. Again, I do not agree with your definition. But your sentence structure is okay.)

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Thanks for your reply Sir,

Sorry about my last questions, how about these ones, I mean grammatically only.


Which means, I am doing the good job. (Does this one work?)

Which means that I do the good job. (Works)

Which means I doing the good job. (Does this one work?)


Thanks again

John, you should start a new thread rather than adding new questions to prior questions.

That aside, I do not like any of your "which" sentences. Which is a pronoun is used to introduce a relative clause. In my view, these are phrases, not sentences.

I got an award, which means (that) I am doing a good job. (This means that at present I am doing a good job.)

or

I got an award, which means (that) I do a good job. (This is more of a state. I always do a good job.)

Which refers to the award. The award means that I am doing a good job. Note "a good job", not "the good job".

You will also note that "that" is optional. You can either include "that" or not.

In the examples I provided, I would use the first. Awards are usually given for a period, say a month, year, or some other period. For this period, the company recognized my good work.

Again, I encourage you to start a new thread when asking a new question.

I hope this helps.

Thanks Sir,

Sorry about the annoying, I promise that I will do a new thread next time. However thanks for your patience to answer my questions.


Regards.

Aki

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Thank you, John.