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Hello Teachers,

Would you please point out the grammaticall errors in the following para? I have identified two mistakes, which are highlighted in red.

The trophies for the winning teams in volleyball and cricket are duly engraved and are here. Given the informal, largely-for-fun-sake nature of the competition, I do not think it IS appropriate to drag the entire division down to the cafeteria for a big presentation. So we will make this purely voluntarily (voluntary?) -- except for the winning teams, of course! The presentation will take place from 3 to 3:15 at the Kennedy Space Center. Suresh will present the award for volleyball while Karthik, cricket. Kennedy is not that big, so I expect we will have standing room only.
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Hi Krish,

Would you please point out the grammaticall errors in the following para? I have identified two mistakes, which are highlighted in red.

The trophies for the winning teams in volleyball and cricket are duly engraved and are here. Given the informal, largely-for-fun-sake (too many hyphens, I'd omit them all and just say 'largely for fun nature') nature of the competition, I do not think it IS ('is' seems OK to me, although optional) appropriate to drag the entire division down to the cafeteria for a big presentation. comma, not period So we will make this purely voluntarily (voluntary?) yes, voluntary -- except for the winning teams, of course! The presentation will take place from 3 to 3:15 at the Kennedy Space Center. Suresh will present the award for volleyball while 'and', not 'while' Karthik, for cricket. Kennedy is not that big, so I expect we will have standing room only.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks a lot, Clive. Would you please explain to me why the word 'is' is optional in the sentence 'I do not think it.....'? What is the rule to follow here?
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The pronoun "it" doesn't have a verb. Isn't the word "appropriate" an adjective? I think "it" needs the verb "is" in that sentence.

I've always tried to keep times parallel. If one is 3:30, I'd make the other 3:00.

Ikia
Hi,

Would you please explain to me why the word 'is' is optional in the sentence 'I do not think it.....'? What is the rule to follow here? I don't think there's a rule, I think it's just elision based on usage. I'd say it's more common to include the verb than to omit it.

Omission makes the sentence more stylish writing. In speaking, it would normally not be omitted. We normally say 'I think you are wrong' rather than 'I think you wrong', which is a very elevated, rather pompous way of speaking.

Best wishes, Clive
Thanks again, Clive. Would you mind giving a couple of examples where I can omit a verb? Is it allowed in formal writing?
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Hi,

Would you mind giving a couple of examples where I can omit a verb? Is it allowed in formal writing?


Well, when I spoke of verb omission, I was thinking specifically of the verb 'be', as in the example I quoted, 'I think you wrong,' which is quite literary and stylish.

I'm having trouble thinking of any other situations with other verbs. Perhaps -

'You sick?' Informal

'I've called three times and I won't (call, omitted) again'. Pretty standard

Swan discusses ellipsis in his Practical English Usage, sections 196 to 1999. He has a lot on main verb ellipsis when there is an auxiliary verb.

Best wishes, Clive
Great, Thanks.