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Dear teachers,

Would you please correct the following exercises ?

I/ CONDITIONAL :

1) You’re late again! If you a) (be) = ARE late again tomorrow, your pay b) (stop) = WILL BE STOPPED.

2) The passengers at the front of the plane were all killed, but Alice, who was sitting at the back, survived. If she a) (sit) = HAD SAT / HAD BEEN SITTING nearer the front, she b) (kill) = WOULD’VE BEN KILLED.

3) If you (be able to) = ARE / WERE ABLE TO do this exercise, you (be) = WILL / WOULD BE very clever.

II/ WISH :

1) The weather is horrible. =
a) I wish the weather were warmer. / b) I wish it were shiny. (?)

2) Last night we went to the Ritz restaurant, and I was ill all night. =
I wish we/I had not been/gone to the Ritz restaurant last night; I was ill all night.

3) a) I wanted to go to Spain. b) But the rest of my family persuaded me to come to Westby. =
a) I wished I had gone to Spain. b) And I whished the rest of my family hadn’t persuaded me to come to Westby.

III/ SENTENCE TRANSFORMATION :

1) You’re going to end up in prison if you don’t change your ways.
= Unless you change your ways, you will end up in prison.

2) The policeman told us to fit new locks on the door.
= The policeman suggested that we fit / should fit new locks…

3) Thieves broke into our house while we were on holidays.
= Our house was broken into while we were…

4) Would you like me to call the police ?
= I shall call the police if you want me to.

5) You can borrow the car, but you’ve got to fill it up with petrol.
= Provided you fill the car up with petrol, you can borrow it.

Many thanks,
Hela
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Comments  (Page 2) 
3c. If you were able to do this exercise, you would be very clever.

(I don't myself see 'are/would be' as a possibility.)

JTT: The question "why not" immediately comes to mind, Mr P. If you would be so kind?
3) If you (be able to) = ARE / WERE ABLE TO do this exercise, you (be) = WILL / WOULD BE very clever. NO 'WILL'; ARE/WOULD BE

Hela:
Why should I combine ARE with WOULD BE ? Can I have ARE able to do... / you ARE very... ?

JTT: We'll leave this one to Mr P for now.

2) Last night we went to the Ritz restaurant, and I was ill all night. =
I wish we/I had not been/gone to the Ritz restaurant last night; I was ill all night. NO BEEN

Hela:
Why's that ?

JTT: I'm really not sure right now, Hela. It just doesn't sound natural for some reason.

4) Would you like me to call the police ?
= I shall call the police if you want me to. SHALL SOUNDS STRONGER THAN WILL

Hela:
Should I say: "I will call the police if you want me to"? And is "shall" not that right here ?

JTT: It's not a matter of 'shall' being right or wrong. As I said, shall sounds stronger than will. For NaE it would be highly unlikely. BrE, well, you'll have to ask Nona/Abbie or MrP.
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Hello again Hela

Just to clarify:

3d. ?If you are able to do this exercise, you would be very clever.

If someone said this to me, I would find it very strange. 'You must be very clever' would be the natural continuation; 'you are very clever' would also be quite likely.

But 'you would be very clever' doesn't quite fit. 'Would' can't be explained as a 'polite would', in this context; so it must be the 'would' from a type 2 main clause. Since the IF clause is a type 1, the whole sentence gives an effect of 'changing horses in mid-stream'.

It may sound differently to other members, though.

4a. I shall call the police if you want me to.
4b. I will call the police if you want me to.
4c. I'll call the police if you want me to.

I don't detect any difference in 'strength' between these versions in BrE. 4c would probably be the most natural version.

MrP
Thank you very much MrP.

Kind regards,
Hela
Dear teachers,

What do you think of my answers to this sentence transformation exercise ?

1) I went down with 'flu as soon as I had recovered from bronchitis.
No sooner… had I recovered from bronchitis than I went down with a ‘flu.

2) She said she thought I was a liar.
She accused… me a) of being a liar / b) of lying / c) to be a liar ?

3) If we don't hear from you within seven days, the order will be cancelled.
Unless… we hear from you a) in / b) within seven days, the order will be cancelled.

4) If you didn't contribute generously, we couldn't continue our work.
But for… your generous contribution, we couldn't continue our work.

5) She is a qualified doctor, yet she was not able to diagnose the illness.
If she… is a qualified doctor, she should have been able to diagnose the illness.

6) I wanted to go on competing, but the doctor advised me not to because I looked very tired.
I wanted to go on competing, but the doctor told me I… had better not because I looked very tired.

7) “It’s a little late,” said Wendy. “Do you think we will be able to get in?”
Wendy told David… that it was a little late and asked her a) if / b) whether they would be able to get in.

Thank you for your help.
Hela
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Mr Pedantic wrote:
Just to clarify:

3d. If you're able to do this exercise, you would be very clever.

If someone said this to me, I would find it very strange. 'You must be very clever' would be the natural continuation; 'you are very clever' would also be quite likely.

But 'you would be very clever' doesn't quite fit. 'Would' can't be explained as a 'polite would', in this context; so it must be the 'would' from a type 2 main clause. Since the IF clause is a type 1, the whole sentence gives an effect of 'changing horses in mid-stream'.

==

JTT: Mr Pedantic is under the mistaken impression that these "conditional types" are frozen formulas.

2. The person who is bringing the pizza, that would be Joe.

Using such a collocation is very common. To suggest that ENLs are somehow programmed to reply like robots is absurd, to say the least.

A: Who's that?

B: That's Fred. OR That would be Fred.
1) I [went] CAME down with THE flu as soon as I had recovered from bronchitis.
No sooner had I recovered from bronchitis than I [went] CAME down with [a] THE flu.

'a case of the flu' is ok

2) She said she thought I was a liar.
She accused… me a) of being a liar / b) of lying / c) to be a liar ?

a - OK b - OK c - NO

3) If we don't hear from you within seven days, the order will be cancelled.
Unless… we hear from you a) in / b) within seven days, the order will be cancelled.

I'd stick with 'within', Hela.

4) If you didn't contribute generously, we couldn't continue our work.
But for your generous contributionS, we couldn't continue our work.

OR "Without your generous ... "

5) She is a qualified doctor, yet she was not able to diagnose the illness.
A. If she… is a qualified doctor, she should have been able to diagnose the illness.

A. expresses a doubtfulness that isn't present in your first sentence. A closer meaning would be,

"Given that she is a qualified doctor, she should have ... "

6) I wanted to go on competing, but the doctor advised me not to because I looked very tired.
I wanted to go on competing, but the doctor told me I had better not because I looked very tired.

OK

7) “It’s a little late,” said Wendy. “Do you think we will be able to get in?”

Wendy told David that it was a little late and asked [her] HIM a) if / b) whether they would be able to get in.

Either is okay.
Mr Pedantic is under the mistaken impression that these "conditional types" are frozen formulas

On the contrary, as I commented before: '[the sentence] may sound differently to other members'.

That said, I would indeed find it a strange 'collocation'. Many strangenesses are 'common': if you've ever read any transcripts of spoken English, you'll know it consists mostly of mistakes, repetitions, stumblings, revisitings, and self-deletions. But every 'ENL' will automatically edit his utterances into something more sensible, if he has to type them out; which is to say, he will recognize 'mistakes', rather than 'examples of alternative grammar'.

In this case, if I heard:

3d. If you're able to do this exercise, you would be very clever.

I would take it for a mistake, and mentally correct it to:

3e. If you're able to do this exercise, you must be very clever.

or

3f. If you were able to do this exercise, you would be very clever.

I don't believe the 'would' idiom you mention (your example B) could be used in the main clause, in this instance. Here, the main clause draws a conclusion from information present in the IF clause; whereas in the 'would' idiom, the answer presents new information.

MrP
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Thank you both for your interesting comments!

Kind regards,
Hela