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I am always eager to learn how to use new applications and eager to improve my existing knowledge of how to use Microsoft applications.

I don't know if the bold works here. A noun (phrase or clause) is required. What is the phrase in bold currently if it is in fact correct?

Maybe it is a noun clause without an implicit subject/actor of the infinitive clause, but I don't know if such constructions can function as noun clauses...
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English 1b3Maybe it is a noun clause without an implicit subject/actor of the infinitive clause, but I don't know if such constructions can function as noun clauses
It's a noun clause -- so it can function as a noun clause. Emotion: smile As you say, the subject is implicit.

These clauses are derived from questions. They are indirect questions with an infinitive.

my knowledge of how a person uses this application. [from How does a person use this application?]

>
my knowledge of how to use this application.

He doesn't know what he should [do / say / ...]. [from What should he [do / say / ...]?]
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He doesn't know what to [do / say / ...].

The instructions don't explain where [we / one / a person] should attach the handle. [from Where should [we / one / a person] attach the handle?]
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The instructions don't explain where to attach the handle.

CJ
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[H]

Thanks a lot for that. My example seems to read slightly strangely to me. I'm not sure if the sentence should be re-casted of if it's just me that doesn't like the way it reads.
CalifJimIt's a noun clause -- so it can function as a noun clause.
Yeah, that was a bit silly of me
English 1b3I'm not sure if the sentence should be re-casted recast
You can leave out how to use if you really want to change something. Otherwise, it looks fine to me.

CJ
CalifJimI'm not sure if the sentence should be re-casted recast

Darn, yet another irregular verb highlighting my ignorance. Ah well, won't make the same mistake again.
CalifJimYou can leave out how to use if you really want to change something. Otherwise, it looks fine to me.
Hmm, I was thinking that, but I felt the meaning was slightly different. Maybe I should, thanks.
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