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Hi there,

Could you check for me if I have made any mistakes in these sentences, please?


This is an answer I found in the dictionary.

I saw you did that.

I saw you parked your car there..

I saw it written as ….. (Passive voice, I guess?)


Thanks

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John Aki

This is an answer (that) I found in the dictionary.

I saw (that) you did that.

I saw (that) you parked your car there..

I saw (that) it (was) written as ….. (Passive voice, I guess? Yes.)

As shown.

CJ

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Thank you Mr CJ.

I like your comments.


Regards

Aki

Mr. CJ

Sorry to bother you one more time on the same issue, could you please check these sentences for me again?

As we all emit "that" this is why I am confused the patterns all the time, you are the one emphasizing "that" of all teachers I have met which made more sense to me both in the pattern and grammar. Would be excited to hear back from your comments.


There is a car (that) parked in my driveway. (Two clauses with "that")

There is a bus going to city.

I found (that) it broke.

I found it broken. (Incorrect) unless, I found (that) it is broken.

It is found broken. (Passive)

There is a camera (that) mounted on the wall.

There is a light hanging from the ceiling.

This brand is my most frequently buying.

This brand is the best sold in the market. (Passive voice)

We can save more water doing this way...

You have showed me the photo taken by your friend. (Passive)

The injured man was taken to the hospital. (Passive)


Thanks in advance.

Aki

The problem is that you are trying to learn too many grammatical patterns at the same time.

Let's separate them into groups.

1) Sentences with little introductory clauses.
She said (that) it broke. / He thought (that) the light was too bright. /
We know (that) the movie is good.

You can say 'that' or not in the sentences above.

2) Passive sentences.
That photo was taken by your friend. / The camera is mounted on the wall. / This beautiful jewel was given to the queen.

3) Relative clauses (not full sentences) based on passive sentences.
the photo (that was) taken by your friend / the camera (that is) mounted on the wall / the jewel (that was) given to the queen

You can say 'that was'/'that is' or not in the clauses above. You must say both words or not say either word. Don't say just one of the two words because the connector 'that was' (or 'that is') is not the same as the connector 'that'.

In the clauses above, you may say 'which' instead of 'that', for example, the photo (which was) taken by your friend. You cannot do this in group 1.

4) Sentences that contain the relative clauses in group 3.
This is the photo (that was) taken by your friend.
I like the camera (that was) mounted on the wall.
The jewel (that was) given to the queen was a diamond.

These are clauses inside sentences. It's a clause embedded inside a sentence. The outside sentence is active. The embedded clause is passive.


Groups 5, 6, and 7 are like groups 2, 3, and 4.

5) Active sentences with a continuous tense (-ing).
A bus is going to Elm Street. / The cat was sleeping in the corner. / The radio was making too much noise.

6) Relative clauses (not full sentences) based on active sentences with -ing.
a bus (that is) going to Elm Street / the cat (that was) sleeping in the corner /
the radio (that was) making too much noise

You can use 'which' instead of 'that'.

7) Sentences that contain the relative clauses in group 6.
There is a bus (that is) going to Elm Street.
The cat (that was) sleeping in the corner caught a mouse today.
We sold the radio (that was) making too much noise.

The outside sentence is active, and the embedded clause is also active.

8) Participle clause of means, method, way. (Answers 'how?')

This is more complicated than it appears below. I'll just give you the basics.

You can gain experience (by) doing a lot of different jobs.
The police wasted time (by) talking to the wrong people.
He made a mistake (by) saying "Who is you?"

On these you can use 'by' or not. For a true participle clause, you don't say 'by'.


You need a grammar book. I can't take the time to teach you every pattern. If I continued with all the grammatical patterns in English, there would be hundreds of different patterns, maybe thousands. Emotion: surprise

But maybe the patterns I showed you above will help.

I'll comment briefly on your examples.

There is a car (that is) parked in my driveway. See 4) above.

There is a bus (that is) going to city. See 7 above.

I found (that) it broke. See 1 above.

I found it broken. (Incorrect) unless, I found (that) it is broken.
I found (that) it was broken. See 1 above.

It is found broken. (Passive) More likely: It was found broken.

There is a camera (that is) mounted on the wall. See 4).

There is a light (that is) hanging from the ceiling. See 7).

This brand is my most frequently buying. Wrong.
This is the brand that I buy most frequently. OK.

This brand is the best sold in the market. (Passive voice) Wrong.
This is the best-selling brand on the market. OK.

We can save more water (by) doing this. way...
'doing this' is called a participle clause. It implies 'by'.
'by' says how something is done. See 8) above.

You have showed me the photo (that was) taken by your friend. (Passive)
The main sentence is active; the relative clause is passive. See 4).

The injured man was taken to the hospital. (Passive) OK.

Site Hint: Check out our list of pronunciation videos.

Firstly we really appreciate your reply Mr. CJ

Our text books and grammar books are rather useless, this is why we seeking a professional teacher like you in here. We are impressive by your comments, certainly we learn a lot from here. In the result I think (that) I understand all the patterns as you had tough me.

Could you please check for me once more if I am correct in in these structures? last time I promised.

Followings are active voice although they sound like passive to us semantically, as car can't park itself unless "Tesla" we only have Toyota here anyway. My point is they are same patterns, "Verb + Adjective", don't worry about a conjunction "that" in this chapter please.


1) A car parked in my driveway. (Past simple and active, no doubt)

A car is parked in my driveway. (Verb + Adjective) (It sounds like an passive to me)

There is a car parked in my driveway. (Verb + Adjective)

2) A camera mounted on the wall. (Past simple and active, no doubt)

A camera is mounded on the wall. (Verb + Adjective)

There is a camera mounded on the wall. (Verb + Adjective)

3) We can meet in the shop named "Super store". (Verb + Adjective)

I use a phone named "Sony". (Verb + Adjective)

There is no one named/called "Tony" in our class. (Verb + Adjective)


Again, we would be hyper-excited to hear back from you.

Aki from Tokyo university

Hi Sir.

After thought, express in this way is better.


1) A car that is parked in my driveway. (Verb + past participle) (Passive)

2) A camera that is mounded on the wall. (Verb + past participle) (Passive)

Cheers

Hi Sir,

Please ignore the last two messages, after long thought here is my revision. I am confidence (that) I am correct this time, grammar is killing me as it is far more difficult than any medical courses trust me....


1) A car parked in my driveway. (Past simple, active but semantically incorrect as car can't park itself)

A car that is parked in my driveway. (Passive voice)

There is a car (that is) parked in my driveway. (Active outside, passive inside)

2) A camera mounted on the wall. (Past simple, active it can be semantically incorrect)

A camera that is mounded on the wall. (Passive)

There is a camera (that is ) mounded on the wall. (Active outside, passive inside)

3) We can meet in the shop named "Super store". (Verb + past participle) (Passive)

I use a phone named "Sony". (Same above)

There is no one named/called "Tony" in our class. (Same above)


Cheers

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John AkiPlease ignore the last two messages. After long thought here is my revision. I am confidence confident (that) I am correct this time. Grammar is killing me as it is far more difficult than any medical courses. Trust me.
John Aki1) A car parked in my driveway. (Past simple, active but semantically incorrect as car can't park itself)

Correct. But it can also be seen as the reduced form that we see in the next example below.

a car parked in my driveway < a car that is/was parked in my driveway

John Akia car that is parked in my driveway (Passive voice)

No punctuation because it's not a sentence. The underlined part is a relative clause in passive voice.

John AkiThere is a car (that is) parked in my driveway. (Active outside, passive inside)

Correct. (There is also the interpretation that 'parked' is an adjective. In that case we can say that both parts are active. But let's not talk about that now.)

John Aki2) A camera mounted on the wall. (Past simple, active it can be semantically incorrect)

A native speaker would hear this as a reduced relative clause (underlined below). It is too strange semantically, as you say, to consider a full sentence.

a camera mounted on the wall< a camera that is mounted on the wall

John Akia camera that is mounted on the wall (Passive)

As in 1), this should not be punctuated because it's not a full sentence. It has a relative clause in passive voice. (Alternate interpretation: 'mounted' is an adjective and the clause is active.)

John AkiThere is a camera (that is ) mounted on the wall. (Active outside, passive inside)

Correct. (Note: 'mound' and 'mount' are two different words.)


Before I continue, let me explain a little about the two interpretations of these "passive" constructions.

A form of be, e.g., is, was, are, were, followed by a past participle (parked, mounted) has two meanings.

1. It may say that the subject of the sentence is in a certain state.

The door is closed. The door was closed.
= The door is not open. The door was not open.
It's like we're looking at a photo of a door.

2. It may say that the subject of the sentence is involved in an action. The action may occur regularly or it may occur only once. But most often the action happens regularly if the sentence is in the present tense, and the action happened once if the sentence is in the past tense.

The door is closed (every day). The door was closed (at 5 o'clock).
= Somebody closes the door (every day). Somebody closed the door (at 5 o'clock).
It's like we're looking at a video of a door, and we see that somebody closes it.

Summary:

1. STATE. ("photo") The past participle is an ADJECTIVE. The clause is ACTIVE.
2. ACTION. ("video") The past participle is a VERB. The clause is PASSIVE.


Try to imagine these situations both ways:

The picture was mounted on the wall.
The car is parked in front of the garage.
The building was destroyed.

Can you make your brain understand each sentence in both ways — the state and the action?


This post is getting too long. I'll reply to the remaining questions in another post later.

CJ

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