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Hi,

Could you please check for me, If I used and understood these words correctly?


Can you tolerate this pain? (Accept it?)

Can you endure this pain? (Suffer it?, much stronger in meaning)

I had to tolerate the bus delay for a hour. (Accept)

I had to endure the bus delay for a hour . (Suffer)

My tolerance / toleration for heat is fairly good, because I live in tropical. (Both are nouns, therefore they are both correct?)

There is no religious tolerance / toleration in certain countries. (Same above?)


Thanks in advance.

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John Aki

Can you tolerate this pain? (Accept it?) OK.

Can you endure this pain? (Suffer it?, much stronger in meaning) OK. 'endure' seems more long-term to me.

We tolerate the pain of a quick procedure like a vaccination. We endure the pain of a bad back for years.

This is my impression anyway.

I had to tolerate the bus delay for a hour. (Accept) No.

I had to endure the bus delay for a hour . (Suffer) No.

We would not use these words for something as trivial as a bus delay. If it's something that happens often, you might say

"The buses are never on time. I had to put up with another bus delay today."

"People do not like being shut up in their homes because of Covid-19, but they put up with it."

My tolerance / toleration for heat is fairly good, because I live in a tropical region. (Both are nouns, therefore they are both correct?) We don't use 'toleration' much these days.

'tolerance for heat' can also be said as 'heat tolerance'.

"August is one of those months in which you can test the heat tolerance of your plants."

There is no religious tolerance / toleration in certain countries. (Same above?) We don't use 'toleration' much these days.

I recommend that you use only 'tolerance'. This word has been used much more than 'toleration' for the last 100 years, even though the meaning is the same.

This pain is tolerable without an Aspiran. aspirin.(Acceptable)

Note the spelling 'aspirin'. Not capitalized.

Note these phrases:

to take aspirin; to take some aspirin (unspecified amount); to take an aspirin (one tablet); to take two aspirin (two tablets)

This pain is not endurable. It really needs an Aspiran. aspirin. (Not sufferable) A pain that must be endured is probably too strong to be affected by aspirin. You'll need a stronger medication for pain relief.

CJ

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Comments  

Also,

This pain is tolerable without an Aspiran. (Acceptable)

This pain is not endurable, it really needs an Aspiran. (Not sufferable)


Cheers

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 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.

Thanks Mr CJ,

How about,

Air or water pollutant.

Air or water pollution.

I wonder which word is correct nowadays?


Cheers

Sir,

I would like to add one more please? Am I correct in this grammar?


It was appalling that so many did it. (With an conjunction.)

It was appalling so many doing / did it. (Was doing it)


Cheers

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Both words are possible if you use them correctly. Emotion: smile

A pollutant is something that causes pollution.

You don't want to drink water that contains gasoline because gasoline is a pollutant. Gasoline causes water pollution.

Pollution is what happens when air or water contains pollutants. When there are many different pollutants in the air, we say that the air is polluted.

Pollution is the generalized problem we have when a lot of the air and water contain pollutants (like carbon dioxide, methane, smoke from industries, etc.). In some cities you can sometimes barely breathe because of the pollution.

CJ

John AkiIt was appalling that so many did it.

Correct.

John AkiIt was appalling so many doing it.

Wrong.

John AkiIt was appalling so many did it.

Correct. You may omit "that".

John AkiIt was appalling that so many were doing it.

Correct as shown above. You need the auxiliary verb 'were'.

John AkiIt was appalling so many were doing it.

Correct as shown above. You may omit "that".


You must learn the tenses a little better. Note that continuous tenses require an auxiliary verb (is, are, was, were). You can't create a finite clause with just a verb in -ing.

Singular
he does it; he did it (present; past)
he is doing it; he was doing it (present continuous; past continuous)

Plural
they do it; they did it (present; past)
they are doing it; they were doing it (present continuous; past continuous)

If you have just a verb with -ing and no auxiliary verb, you don't have a finite clause. You might have a non-finite clause or something else, but you don't have a finite clause.

The main clause and any that-clause that goes with it have to be finite clauses (even if you omit 'that').

[FINITE CLAUSE] [that FINITE CLAUSE].

I am sure that they left. OK.
I am sure that they were leaving. OK.
I am sure that they leaving. NO!

Phil thinks that Lucy works in the garden. OK.
Phil thinks that Lucy is working in the garden. OK.
Phil thinks that Lucy working in the garden. NO!

You can omit 'that' in all six of the sentences above, but that doesn't change the fact that you need both clauses to be finite clauses.

CJ

Thanks Sir,

Do you think, I can express in this pattern?


I skimmed through the newspaper trying to find an article. ("Skim" is an auxiliary verb) (One clause)

I was skimming through the newspaper trying to find an article. ("Was" is an auxiliary verb, still one clause)

I skimmed or was skimming through the newspaper, I tried to find an article. (No an auxiliary here, a new clause)

I skimmed or was skimming through the newspaper, I was trying to find an article. (An auxiliary appeared, two clauses)

"I, you, he, she, they, people, Lucy, comma, so ...etc" These words are not conjunctions, but if added these words in sentences are dividing into two clauses for sure.

It was appealing so many people were doing it. (It divided into two clauses)

It was appealing, he was doing it. (Comma is an optional, It still divided into two clauses)

It was appealing, he did it. (Comma is an optional, not an auxiliary verb here)


Thanks in advance.

John Aki

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I mean, in grammar we tend to treat these words "I, you, he, she, they, people, Lucy, comma, so ...etc"

as dividers to make a second clauses. Therefore we need "an auxiliary verb"

Hopefully my patterns are making sense to you, then I am totally clear in this subject as it had bothered me for a while.


Very appreciative again

John Aki

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