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Hi,

Could you please teach me how to distinguish these three words in the right place? As they all an adjective.


A electric/electrical/electronic

device, good, game, keyboard, equipment, component, toys, bill, car..etc


Thanks

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John AkiCould you please teach me how to distinguish these three words in the right place?

These are a matter of learning the usual associations of words.

'electric' and 'electrical' are sometimes interchangeable, but on average, 'electric' is used for devices, and 'electrical' is used for the equipment and materials associated with working with electricity or for the phenomena of electricity.

'electric' devices are usually those that plug in, while 'electronic' devices are usually those that operate with batteries.

There are exceptions to these very general observations. Your best chance of learning them is to follow the patterns in the lists below.

Examples:

electric car, electric vehicle, electric light, electric appliance, electric mixer, electric guitar, electric stove, electric blanket, electric pressure cooker, electric wheel chair, electric garage door opener, electric motor, electric power, electric utility, electric bill, electric shock, electric shock therapy (psychiatric), electric field (term of physics)

electrical equipment, electrical cord, electrical tape, electrical wire, electrical wiring, electrical outlet, electrical bursts, electrical impulses, electrical hookup, electrical system, electrical businesses, electrical risks, electrical signals, electrical short-circuit, electrical engineering, electrical conductivity, electrical fault, electrical charge, electrical issues, electrical effect

electronic device, electronic media, electronic clock, electronic products, electronic sign, electronic circuit board, electronic surveillance, electronic camera, electronic data, electronic games, electronic waste, electronic equipment, electronic health records, electronic medical records, electronic payment system, electronic sensors, electronic tracking, electronic spying, electronic component, electronic payment, electronic monitor, electronic services, electronic tag, electronic musical instrument, electronic books, electronic calculator

CJ

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Thanks you Sir,

Could you please comments another pose for me?


https://www.englishforums.com/English/GrammarHelpPlease/bpgvcv/post.htm#sc2703416


Cheers

What a great answer on this one pose, many of the dictionaries can't really specific these differences.

I do notice "electric" and "electrical" are sometimes interchangeable. Generally speaking electrical is more related to people, while electric is for plugging in devices.

Electronic devices are usually small with batteries.


Dictionaries are really useless compare to your knowledges.

Thank you again Sir.

John Aki

John AkiCould you please comments comment on another pose for me?

Not "pose".

post

It's written on the green button below every post you make!

CJ

(I'll take a look.)

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
John AkiWhat a great answer on this one pose

Not "pose".

post

John AkiMany of the dictionaries can't really specific specify these differences.

As shown.

No. You need a learner's dictionary for that — and a lot of lessons on usage. Dictionaries are mostly for people who know English already. They provide reminders for native speakers. Very few of them provide information on usage because native speakers usually understand the usage already.

CJ

Hi Sir,

I took your advice and went book stores to get myself a couple of the learner's dictionaries.

Hope them help / helping my future learning. Our young English teacher (Exchange student from Aussie) said that many of the questions that I raised were far behind his knowledges. Even though he knew the correct answers but he couldn't explain them grammatically and theoretically.


Teaching and explaining English grammatically is a skill. It requires many training courses, most of native speakers won't understand these terms and structures "Past simple, present continuous and past perfect...etc".


Thanks for your time anyway.

John Aki

John AkiI took your advice and went to some book stores to get myself a couple of the learner's dictionaries.

Excellent! Bravo!

John AkiHope them help / helping I hope they help in my future learning.

I hope so, too.

Good luck and take care.

Teachers: We supply a list of EFL job vacancies

Thanks you Sir,

Would you please also check for me if these sentences are grammatically to you?


This forum allow posting any English questions. (A verb here)

This forum allow posts any English questions. (A noun here)

He asked me a question relating to / relative to / relevant to / pertinent to English grammar. (All of them are adjectives and correct. However "pertinent" is a more high registered word?)

Comparatively / relatively to his age he is a talent. (Both words are correct? "comparing to his age with his peers"

therefore I would say "comparatively" is a better word choice in here?)


Cheers

John Aki

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