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Hi,

Could you please check for me if I have made any mistake in these sentences?


Acidic drinks might irritate our empty stomach. (Same meaning as in" inflame" however we don't feel "inflammation", we do feel "irritation") (Discomfort)

I felt irritated after drinking lemon water, even it had been diluted. (Discomfort)

My irritation have gone after I have taken some solid foods. (Discomfort)


Cheers

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John Aki

Acidic drinks might irritate our empty stomach. (Same meaning as in" inflame" however we don't feel "inflammation", we do feel "irritation") (Discomfort)

I felt irritated after drinking lemon water, even it had been diluted. (Discomfort)

My irritation have gone after I have taken some solid foods. (Discomfort)

OK. Here's how an English speaker would say those:

Acidic drinks can irritate an empty stomach.
My stomach felt irritated after I drank some water with just a little lemon in it.
The irritation went away after I ate some solid food.


'irritate' is a little unusual because if you say "I felt irritated", it means you are annoyed. Something has made you angry or upset. But if you say that your stomach felt irritated, it does not have that meaning.

It's wrong to say My irritation have gone because 'irritation' is singular. It needs the verb 'has', not 'have'. My irritation has gone would be correct.

However, that last sentence is also wrong because you can't use the present perfect tense (has gone) together with an after-clause or with a before-clause or with a when-clause. Any mention of a specific time (on Tuesday, at 5 o'clock, after I took a nap, when I walked to school, etc.) means you can't use the present perfect tense. You have to use the simple past instead. That's why I changed have gone to went away.

CJ

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Thanks Mr CJ,

Could you please tell me which word would you use in your daily conversation? or do you think it is more common to you between these two words " woke up" and "awaken".


The noise woke me up / awakened me.

I was woken up / awakened by the noise.

I haven't woken up / awakened yap, call me later.

I don't like being woken up / awakened in the morning.


Thanks John Aki

John Akimore common ... " woke up" and "awaken".

"woke up"

I'd use the first of the two choices in all four sentences below, but both are correct.

The noise woke me up / awakened me.

I was woken up / awakened by the noise.

I haven't woken up / awakened yet; call me later.

I don't like being woken up / awakened in the morning.

CJ

If you'd like to make your head spin with confusion, see

wake/awake/waken

Emotion: smile

CJ

Thanks, many of English words are always confusing anyway. It really takes brain to cope them.

Personally I think "awaken" is more like an adjective to use.

I am still awaken, I stay awaken, I lay awaken on the bed.


Could I just confirm this pattern, in the previous post that you had mentioned "before, after, when" can only take either "present or past simple tenses".

This is important, I have never leaned about it anymore in any grammar books.


My irritation have stopped when I had applied some antiseptic cream(s) . (Past simple)

After I had cleaned my room, I went to gym.

Before I have spoken speak I would like to congratulate Mr CJ for winning a Nobel prize for English education.


John Aki

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John Aki

Personally I think "awaken" is more like an adjective to use.

I am still awaken, I stay awaken, I lay awaken on the bed.

No. The adjective is "awake".

I'm still awake; I'm staying awake; I lay awake on the bed.

John AkiMy irritation have stopped when I had applied some antiseptic cream(s) . (Past simple)

The irritation stopped when I applied some antiseptic cream. OK.
The irritation has stopped when I applied some antiseptic cream. NO.

We're talking about not using the present perfect in the main clause if there is a subordinate clause of time in the same sentence.

John AkiAfter I had cleaned my room, I went to gym.

After I cleaned my room, I went to the gym. OK.
After I cleaned my room, I have gone to the gym. NO.

John AkiBefore I have spokenspeak I would like to congratulate Mr CJ for winning a Nobel prize for English education. Emotion: smile

Your sentence above is correct, but it doesn't illustrate anything related to the rule I gave you. The rule is about the tense in the main clause, not about the tense in the subordinate clause.

Here's an example with a before-clause:

I cleaned my room before I went to the gym. OK.
I have cleaned my room before I went to the gym. NO.

CJ

Sorry about my wrong spelling again in the rush, I meant "awake"


I think"awake" is most commonly for an adjective in use, am I correct?

I am still awake; I am staying awake; I lay awake on the bed.


"Before, after, when" can only take "present or past tense"

This is so important, I wonder does everyone know about these patterns? I mean all native English speaker?


Cheers

John Aki

John AkiI think"awake" is most commonly for an adjective in use, am I correct?

Yes. "awake" is just about the only common adjective we use for "not asleep".

John AkiI am still awake; I am staying awake; I lay awake on the bed.

Right. All OK.

John Aki"Before, after, when" can only take "present or past tense"

You're not saying it right. The tense after 'when', 'after', 'before', or after other subordinators of time is immaterial.

The rule is that the main clause cannot be in the present perfect tense if there is a subordinate clause of time in the same sentence.

I have seen that when I was a child. WRONG. You can't use 'have seen' because there's a when-clause in the same sentence. (It doesn't matter what tense is in the when-clause.)

This must be changed to I saw that when I was a child.

John AkiThis is so important, I wonder does everyone know about these patterns? I mean all native English speaker?

Native speakers instinctively know it, so they never make that kind of mistake (or only rarely), but they can't state it as a rule as I have done above.

Stating such things as rules is only possible if you have learned English grammar from a more scientific point of view.

CJ

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Thanks Mr CJ,

Personally I think this rule is so important for all English learners, I would never know that if I didn't meet / hadn't met you in this forum. (Btw, which part is correct?)


I am glad that I learned about it today. Otherwise I will be wrong for a long time maybe rest of my life.

You see in the real life when I speak or write to anyone, they don't tend to correct my mistakes. Probably they regard / consider that is rude. (Btw which word is more suitable in here?)


However this kind of "politeness" is not a good idea for our improvements. In fact as a foreigner we are more than happy to be corrected. We learn form these mistakes.


Very appreciative, thank you again

John Aki

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