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Hi,

Could you please advise me if these two words share the same meaning?


An abnormal / anomalous weather, behaviour, condition.


Cheers

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'weather' is not countable, so you can't use 'an' with that one. 'behaviour' can be countable or not.

Otherwise, OK. 'abnormal' and 'anomalous' are about the same.

So these are all OK:

Abnormal weather. Anomalous weather. (no 'an')
Abnormal behaviour. Anomalous behaviour.
An abnormal behaviour. An anomalous behaviour.An abnormal condition. An anomalous condition.

CJ

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Thanks Mr CJ,

Since they are about equivalent in the meaning, which one do you think more popular to use?

Between "abnormal and anomalous"?


After a nap, I finally figured out these rules and patterns. Kill me please if I am still wrong~


Before / when I woke up, my cat went out. (Past simple)

Before / when I woke up, my cat had gone out. (Past perfect) (semantically more correct to me)

After I woke up, I went to gym immediately. (Past simple)

After I woke up, I had some ice cream. (Past simple)

After I woke up, I have had some ice cream. (Past perfect, this is incorrect~)

Before you arrived, I (had) fixed it. ("Had" is an optional) (Past perfect or past simple, semantically past perfect is more correct to me)

Before I cleaned the room, I had eaten / ate some breads. (Past perfect or past simple, both are correct. However semantically past perfect is more correct to me)

When I drank some lemon water, I felt irritated in my stomach last night. (Past simple)

When / after I ate some solid food, my irritation went away / stopped. (Past simple)


Thanks in advance

John Aki

John Aki

which one do you think more popular to use?

Between "abnormal and anomalous"?

I'm guessing that "abnormal" is more popular, but I, personally, like "anomalous" very much, so I use it a lot. Emotion: smile

John AkiKill me please if I am still wrong~

Figuratively, of course.

John Aki

Before / when I woke up, my cat went out. (Past simple)

Before / when I woke up, my cat had gone out. (Past perfect) (semantically more correct to me)

Those are OK. (So far we have talked mostly about 'before' and 'after'. We can talk about 'when' in more detail some other time.)

John AkiAfter I woke up, I went to gym immediately. (Past simple)

Correct.

John Aki

After I woke up, I had some ice cream. (Past simple)

After I woke up, I have had some ice cream. (Past perfect, this is incorrect~)

Just as you say, the first one is correct, and the second one is not correct.

John AkiBefore you arrived, I (had) fixed it. Correct. ("Had" is an optional Correct.) (Past perfect or past simple, semantically past perfect is more correct to me OK, but don't get angry if you hear the version with the past simple that you don't like as much. Emotion: wink)
John AkiBefore I cleaned the room, I had eaten / ate some breads. bread. (Past perfect or past simple, both are correct. However semantically past perfect is more correct to me)

Correct. Same comments as for the previous sentence.

John AkiWhen I drank some lemon water, I felt irritated in my stomach last night. (Past simple) Correct except as noted below.

What did I say about "I felt irritated"?Emotion: angry Emotion: big smile

YOU were not annoyed or angry!

..., my stomach felt irritated last night.

John AkiWhen / after I ate some solid food, my the irritation went away / stopped. (Past simple)

Correct as shown. Good.

CJ

Yes, luckily I save my life, at least these structure are correct~


I felt irritated in my stomach last night. VS My stomach felt irritated last night.

Do they sound different to you? I mentioned " stomach" though??


John Aki

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John AkiDo they sound different to you?

Yes. I would never start with "I felt irritated" unless I meant I was starting to get angry. I don't advise it, no matter what else follows.

I felt irritated because of the pain in my stomach.
~ I was becoming angry/annoyed because of the pain in my stomach.

Martha felt irritated and wanted to argue with me.
I felt irritated that I had made a mistake and sounded stupid.
Helen felt so irritated that she wanted to throw the mug at the woman.

CJ

Thanks Mr CJ,

Now I understand~


Cheers

John Aki

Sorry to hassle you again Mr CJ, there are a couple of questions that need your help, please?


There is another word called "aberrant", do you think it shares the exactly same meaning with other two?

Does it also as common as other two to you?


Abnormal / anomalous / aberrant weather.

Abnormal / anomalous / aberrant behaviour.

An abnormal / anomalous / aberrant condition.


When / before I awakened, my wife had lift. (I haven't got a wife yup..... anyway this is grammatical)

After I awakened, my wife had lift. (Could this one make sense to you, semantically?)

After I awakened, I found that my wife had lift. (correct I guess)


Cheers

John Aki

Students: Are you brave enough to let our tutors analyse your pronunciation?
John Aki"aberrant"

This is a synonym of the others. It sounds more normal with "behaviour" than with "weather" or "condition", but all three are possible.

For all three (weather, behaviour, condition) the most usual word is "abnormal". The least usual is "aberrant".

CJ

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