+0

Hi,

Could you please check for me if I am correct in these grammar?


Are you hurt? ("Hurt" here is an adjective)

I got hurt. ("Hurt" here is an adjective)

I feel hurt. ("Hurt" here is can be an adjective or noun?)

I feel pain. ("pain" here is a noun)

It is a really hurt. (A noun here)

It is a really pain. (A noun here)

The medicine made my hurt go away. (A noun here)

The medicine made my pain go away. (A noun here)


Cheers

+2
John Aki

Hi,

Could you please check for me if I am correct in these grammar?


Are you hurt? ("Hurt" here is an adjective) OK.

I got hurt. ("Hurt" here is an adjective) Verb.

I feel hurt. ("Hurt" here is can be an adjective or noun?) Adj. Not noun.

I feel pain. ("pain" here is a noun) OK.

It is a really hurt. (A noun here)

It is a really pain. (A noun here)
"a really" + noun doesn't exist in English.

The medicine made my hurt go away. (A noun here)

The medicine made my pain go away. (A noun here) OK.


Cheers

As shown.

'hurt' is almost never used as a noun meaning 'pain'.

'the hurt' is sometimes used for emotional pain, e.g., "the hurt she felt when her husband died".

CJ

Comments  
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Thanks Mr CJ.


John Aki

Mr CJ,

Do you agrees that these both words are correct in these sentences?


The professor required / requested me to be here by 9.30 am.

I was required / requested to be here by 9.30 am.


Cheers

John Aki

John Aki

Do you agrees agree that these both of these words are correct in these sentences?


The professor required / requested me to be here by 9.30 am.

I was required / requested to be here by 9.30 am.

Yes, those are grammatically correct.

However, there is another grammatical pattern that is used for "request" in the active voice, and I think it sounds better:

The professor requested that I be here by 9:30 am.

CJ

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John Aki