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Taken from an article on http://www.cnn.com

"Despite the increased rate of aircraft testing positive over a previous round of testing, Skinner said he "would still maintain that the vast majority of planes do not come up positive."

Shouldnt that be ""Despite the increasing rate of aircraft tested positive ..."
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The testing is still ongoing:

". . . aircraft [still] testing positive over a previous round of testing, . . . ."
I still dont understand.

Why "increased rate" instead of "increasing rate"?
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Series 1: Rates: 20 20 20 20 20 29 29 29 29 29 29 29
Series 2: Rates: 20 21 23 25 25 26 27 28 29 29 31 33

At 29 Series 1 shows an increased rate. (The rate has increased.)
Throughout Series 2, we see an increasing rate. (The rate has been increasing.)

Hope that helps.

CJ
Im sorry but i still dont undertand

"...rate of aircraft testing positive"

Why use the word "testing"? The aircraft doesnt do the test. Why not use the word "tested" as in "I was tested positive for..."

Thanks
Hello Guest

CJ and Casi aren't here at the moment, so I'll try to answer your question.

'To test positive for X' is the usual phrase.

'To test' in this context means: 'to be proven'.

'I tested positive for bad grammar' = 'when they tested me, they discovered that my grammar was bad'.

MrP
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True, the aircraft doesn't do the test! The aircraft undergoes the test. "test" is used in the active voice in form, with passive meaning. ("I tested positive", not "I was tested positive", is the phrase used to mean "I was tested and found (to be) positive".)

That in mind, I think you can see how the following is true:
the aircraft testing positive = the aircraft which test positive

CJ
Why not use the word "tested". . . ?


Using "tested" would be fine, but it doesn't express the intended meaning. -ing means, ongoing, whereas -ed means completed. The reporter is referring to aircraft that a) had been tested and b) that are still in the process of being tested. That is, the testing is an ongoing process, and the reporter is talking about a period of time inside that process:

The aircraft had been tested
A. Despite the increased rate of aircraft tested positive over a previous round of testing . . . .

The aircraft had been tested and they are being tested, again.
B. Despite the increased rate of aircraft testing positive over a previous round of testing . . . .
Casi, You are putting my brain into backflips and spins!
A. doesn't work for me at all!

I sense the difference in participles as the difference between active and passive, not as the difference between present and past. To me, "present" and "past" are misnomers when applied to participles. "to test positive" is practically "to be found positive". Hence, "test", like "be", acts almost as a copular verb here. There is no passive for such verbs, therefore, no past passive participle. (That's why I focused on voice rather than tense in my previous post.) In any case, whether you buy the copular argument or not, I think we can agree that in "X tested positive", "test" is intransitive and as such has no passive.

Consider:
"The number of students becoming restless during class is increasing."

The analog to A. is:
*"The number of students became restless during class is increasing."

Consider:
"The number of patients [being found positive (through tests) / testing positive] for tuberculosis has decreased."

The analog is:
*"The number of patients [been found positive (through tests) / tested positive] for tuberculosis has decreased."

Won't you reconsider? Or help me out if you think I've got it hopelessly muddled!
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