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All the following exchanges contain "mistakes". I am finding it incredibly difficualt to explain what these mistakes are, as I dont fully understand them to BE mistakes. Can anybody help me solve these problems? I would greatly appreciate all help given (I certainly need it!)

1 "Have you got any money"
"Yes, I've been to the bank yesterday"

2 "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight"
"Yes, he is rather slender these days, isn't he?"

3 "Why didn't you answer the telephone?"
"Because I had a bath"

HELP!! Thanks
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All the following exchanges contain "mistakes". I am finding it incredibly difficualt to explain what these mistakes are, as I dont fully understand them to BE mistakes. Can anybody help me solve these problems? I would greatly appreciate all help given (I certainly need it!)

1 "Have you got any money"
"Yes, I've been to the bank yesterday"

JTT: We almost never use the present perfect with a past time adjunct, in this case, .

2 "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight"
"Yes, he is rather slender these days, isn't he?"

JTT: I can't see anything wrong with this one. Oops, yes, I see it now. You forgot the period at the end of the second sentence.Emotion: wink

3 "Why didn't you answer the telephone?"
"Because I had a bath"

"Because I was having a bath". This is a durative action so the past progressive/continuous is in order.
Hello!
A guess for 2:
"Yes, he's (has) been rather slender these days, hasn't he?"
But I don't like the use of "slender" in the context; I'd rather say "He's been looking rather slender", or "he has become rather slender"
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#2 - Losing weight from illness would cause a person to be unhealthily 'thin' rather than sveltely 'slender'.
OK.....Got a REALLY hard one now. Anybody comment on the difference in meaning between the following two?

"The house was very isolated"
"The house was very secluded"

I suggest maybe "isolated" is more of a case of the house being purposefully put on it's own, whereas "secluded" suggests a cosy little hideaway that is maybe "stand alone" because perhaps it's seldom visited due to distance or difficulty of approach?

But am I missing the point? Is there some clever hidden grammatical error?

***
I'd say: "isolated" = far from any other house, village...
"secluded": more "hidden from view"
"isolated" has a more negative feeling than "secluded".
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Hmmm......I think I agree. Do you think a good point is that perhaps the word "isolated" is perhaps not the best to use when describing an inanimate object such as a house?

Interesting.
No, not at all... An isolated house sounds quite fine by me.
What I feel is that "isolated" doesn't come from anybody's will.
On the contrary, "seclude/secluded" sounds to me as if either the person wanted to be secluded (kept apart from), or that the owner of the house made it secluded on peurpose, like a pop star who doesn't want to be bothered by fans or whatever; OR a dog, a prisoner, can have to be secluded from the others because they're aggressive...
That's my feeling, but I may be wrong...
I believe they should be:

1. "Do you have any money?"

"Yes. I went to the bank yesterday."

2. "Is John ill? He's lost a lot of weight."

"Yes. He is rather slender these days, isn't he?"

3. "Why didn't you answer the telephone?"

"Because I was in the bath."

Hope this helps you out!
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