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I have some questions to this practice, could someone look thru it and tell whether you agree with the official answers or not and why?

Find the adverbs in the following sentences and tell what word they modify.

The tour will leave early today.

(A: early/today modify the verb will leave) My question: doesn't "early" modify "today" which modifies "leave"?

I am still unusually tired by afternoon.

( A: still modifies the verb am, unusually modifies the adjective tired) My question: doesn't "still" modify "unusually"?

The stranded hiker quietly gave up the chance of rescue.

(A: quietly/up modify the verb gave) My question: does "up" modify "give", isn't "gave up" regarded as a compound verb and it means "to forfiet, ...ect."? If "up" is an adverb to "give", one can say "down" could be an adverb to "give" too. But have anyone heard of or used "to give down"?

Why couldn't you blow out your candles?

(A: why/n't/out modify the verb could blow) My question: is it a fact that "why" and "not" are adverbs? Is that what you're taught?

My little brother almost always eats the most at dinner.

(A: always modifies the verb eats, almost modifies the adverb always) I have no problem with this one, I kept this one to be compared to the 2nd practice.

Your essay was written very neatly and legibly.

(A: neatly/legibly modify the verb was written, very modifies the adverb neatly (possibly legibly also)) Shown for comparison to 2nd practice.

Thanks a lot.

Raen
Comments  
RaenThe tour will leave early today.

(A: early/today modify the verb will leave) My question: doesn't "early" modify "today" which modifies "leave"?
Either way. early today can be taken as a constituent meaning 'early during this day', early thus modifying today. Or early can be taken as a verb modifier and today as a sentential modifier, in which case they modify separately. The latter case is better illustrated by moving the sentential modifier to the front:
Today the tour will leave early.
(Compare: Yesterday it left late.)
Because there are these two types of adverbs, you can even have such sentences as: Now the tour leaves on time. Earlier it used to leave earlier. (Two uses of earlier -- two different kinds of adverbs.)
CJ
RaenI am still unusually tired by afternoon.

( A: still modifies the verb am, unusually modifies the adjective tired) My question: doesn't "still" modify "unusually"?
I don't hear it that way. I hear still as a sentential modifier. Still (= even these days), I am unusually tired by afternoon.
CJ
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RaenThe stranded hiker quietly gave up the chance of rescue.

(A: quietly/up modify the verb gave) My question: does "up" modify "give", isn't "gave up" regarded as a compound verb and it means "to forfiet, ...ect."? If "up" is an adverb to "give", one can say "down" could be an adverb to "give" too. But have anyone heard of or used "to give down"?
give up is a phrasal verb, yes. I would not call up in give up a modifier. I am not familiar with a verb give down. "Adverb" is a sort of catch-all category and some grammarians call the phrasal verb particles like up and down adverbs.
CJ
Thanks a lot Jim. I am getting the hang of it. Emotion: smile

It seems to leave room for arguement. I wonder if I can resort to that tactic if my pick is different from the official answer...............yeah right, over somebody's dead body. Thanks again.

Raen
RaenWhy couldn't you blow out your candles?

(A: why/n't/out modify the verb could blow) My question: is it a fact that "why" and "not" are adverbs? Is that what you're taught?
Yes. why and not sentential adverbs as discussed above. As above, out is a phrasal verb particle.
CJ
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RaenMy little brother almost always eats the most at dinner.

(A: always modifies the verb eats, almost modifies the adverb always) I have no problem with this one, I kept this one to be compared to the 2nd practice.
OK.
RaenYour essay was written very neatly and legibly.

(A: neatly/legibly modify the verb was written, very modifies the adverb neatly (possibly legibly also)) Shown for comparison to 2nd practice.
OK.
CJ
RaenI wonder if I can resort to that tactic if my pick is different from the official answer.
You can always try! Emotion: smile
To reduce some of your frustration you may have to separate your study into two parts. 'Learning English' and 'Passing the Tests'. The two may differ in terms of the skills you'll need. Emotion: smile
CJ
CalifJim... 'Learning English' and 'Passing the Tests'. The two may differ in terms of the skills you'll need.
That's so sadly true! Emotion: cryingEmotion: cryingEmotion: crying
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