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The introductory clause can also be in another tense. In the following table you can see, for which tense of the introductory clause you have to use backshift in reported speech.

Is this grammatical?

Is it common to place a preposition before 'which' when it is not a relative pronoun? I didn't think so, since surely what follows isn't the object of the preposition... Please explain this.

Thanks
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English 1b3Is it common to place a preposition before 'which' when it is not a relative pronoun?
In my experience it's not particularly common. No.

Still, it exists:

This is the lid for one of these pots -- but for which one?

Usually, for is stranded at the end.

For which employee was this document intended?
Which employee was this document intended for?

CJ
Comments  
Somebody may know their tenses, but they don't know their punctuation.

The introductory clause can also be in another tense. In the following table, (COMMA) you can see,(NO COMMA) for which tense of the introductory clause you have to use backshift in reported speech.

The introductory clause can also be in another tense. In the following table, you can see for which tense of the introductory clause you have to use backshift in reported speech.

more natural:

The introductory clause can also be in another tense. In the following table, you can see which tense of the introductory clause you have to use backshift in reported speech for.
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Hi,
TerryxpressSomebody may know their tenses, but they don't know their punctuation.
I didn't write this sentence. Well aware of the punctuation errors. What I'm not aware of though is the preposition fronting the noun clause. I know it fronts relative pronouns in relative clauses, but I wasn't so sure it fronted 'which' when it is not a relative pronoun.

Can you give me any insights into this?

Ta
 CalifJim's reply was promoted to an answer.
You are obviously quoting, both in that you give the text in blue, and the academic style of writing, and subject.

Again, I find you rather touchy to respond to.
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Terryxpress I find you rather touchy to respond to.

I'm sorry you found me this way. I wasn't touchy. Was just letting you know that it wasn't my sentence, since you felt like claiming I didn't know how to punctuate. Emotion: smile